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Nutrition for Nurses

Chapter Summary

Nutrition for NursesChapter Summary

  • Carbohydrates, fats, protein, and water are essential for all body systems.
  • Helping clients manipulate proper energy intake while maintaining dietary recommendations and satisfying personal tastes requires a basic understanding of nutrition.
  • Carbohydrates provide easily metabolized sugars contributed by grains, legumes, dairy products, fruits, and vegetables.
  • Fats play many essential roles in the body, but because of their caloric density, they can contribute to obesity and cardiovascular disease.
  • Protein is critical to cell development; complete proteins (providing all of the essential amino acids) are regularly needed. Protein can contribute to a diet higher in fat.
  • Water guidelines cover normal fluid losses but may need to be altered for certain conditions.
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© Mar 7, 2024 OpenStax. Textbook content produced by OpenStax is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License . The OpenStax name, OpenStax logo, OpenStax book covers, OpenStax CNX name, and OpenStax CNX logo are not subject to the Creative Commons license and may not be reproduced without the prior and express written consent of Rice University.