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Intermediate Algebra 2e

12.3 Geometric Sequences and Series

Intermediate Algebra 2e12.3 Geometric Sequences and Series
  1. Preface
  2. 1 Foundations
    1. Introduction
    2. 1.1 Use the Language of Algebra
    3. 1.2 Integers
    4. 1.3 Fractions
    5. 1.4 Decimals
    6. 1.5 Properties of Real Numbers
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  3. 2 Solving Linear Equations
    1. Introduction
    2. 2.1 Use a General Strategy to Solve Linear Equations
    3. 2.2 Use a Problem Solving Strategy
    4. 2.3 Solve a Formula for a Specific Variable
    5. 2.4 Solve Mixture and Uniform Motion Applications
    6. 2.5 Solve Linear Inequalities
    7. 2.6 Solve Compound Inequalities
    8. 2.7 Solve Absolute Value Inequalities
    9. Key Terms
    10. Key Concepts
    11. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  4. 3 Graphs and Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 3.1 Graph Linear Equations in Two Variables
    3. 3.2 Slope of a Line
    4. 3.3 Find the Equation of a Line
    5. 3.4 Graph Linear Inequalities in Two Variables
    6. 3.5 Relations and Functions
    7. 3.6 Graphs of Functions
    8. Key Terms
    9. Key Concepts
    10. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  5. 4 Systems of Linear Equations
    1. Introduction
    2. 4.1 Solve Systems of Linear Equations with Two Variables
    3. 4.2 Solve Applications with Systems of Equations
    4. 4.3 Solve Mixture Applications with Systems of Equations
    5. 4.4 Solve Systems of Equations with Three Variables
    6. 4.5 Solve Systems of Equations Using Matrices
    7. 4.6 Solve Systems of Equations Using Determinants
    8. 4.7 Graphing Systems of Linear Inequalities
    9. Key Terms
    10. Key Concepts
    11. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  6. 5 Polynomials and Polynomial Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 5.1 Add and Subtract Polynomials
    3. 5.2 Properties of Exponents and Scientific Notation
    4. 5.3 Multiply Polynomials
    5. 5.4 Dividing Polynomials
    6. Key Terms
    7. Key Concepts
    8. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  7. 6 Factoring
    1. Introduction to Factoring
    2. 6.1 Greatest Common Factor and Factor by Grouping
    3. 6.2 Factor Trinomials
    4. 6.3 Factor Special Products
    5. 6.4 General Strategy for Factoring Polynomials
    6. 6.5 Polynomial Equations
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  8. 7 Rational Expressions and Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 7.1 Multiply and Divide Rational Expressions
    3. 7.2 Add and Subtract Rational Expressions
    4. 7.3 Simplify Complex Rational Expressions
    5. 7.4 Solve Rational Equations
    6. 7.5 Solve Applications with Rational Equations
    7. 7.6 Solve Rational Inequalities
    8. Key Terms
    9. Key Concepts
    10. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  9. 8 Roots and Radicals
    1. Introduction
    2. 8.1 Simplify Expressions with Roots
    3. 8.2 Simplify Radical Expressions
    4. 8.3 Simplify Rational Exponents
    5. 8.4 Add, Subtract, and Multiply Radical Expressions
    6. 8.5 Divide Radical Expressions
    7. 8.6 Solve Radical Equations
    8. 8.7 Use Radicals in Functions
    9. 8.8 Use the Complex Number System
    10. Key Terms
    11. Key Concepts
    12. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  10. 9 Quadratic Equations and Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 9.1 Solve Quadratic Equations Using the Square Root Property
    3. 9.2 Solve Quadratic Equations by Completing the Square
    4. 9.3 Solve Quadratic Equations Using the Quadratic Formula
    5. 9.4 Solve Quadratic Equations in Quadratic Form
    6. 9.5 Solve Applications of Quadratic Equations
    7. 9.6 Graph Quadratic Functions Using Properties
    8. 9.7 Graph Quadratic Functions Using Transformations
    9. 9.8 Solve Quadratic Inequalities
    10. Key Terms
    11. Key Concepts
    12. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  11. 10 Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 10.1 Finding Composite and Inverse Functions
    3. 10.2 Evaluate and Graph Exponential Functions
    4. 10.3 Evaluate and Graph Logarithmic Functions
    5. 10.4 Use the Properties of Logarithms
    6. 10.5 Solve Exponential and Logarithmic Equations
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  12. 11 Conics
    1. Introduction
    2. 11.1 Distance and Midpoint Formulas; Circles
    3. 11.2 Parabolas
    4. 11.3 Ellipses
    5. 11.4 Hyperbolas
    6. 11.5 Solve Systems of Nonlinear Equations
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  13. 12 Sequences, Series and Binomial Theorem
    1. Introduction
    2. 12.1 Sequences
    3. 12.2 Arithmetic Sequences
    4. 12.3 Geometric Sequences and Series
    5. 12.4 Binomial Theorem
    6. Key Terms
    7. Key Concepts
    8. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  14. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
    12. Chapter 12
  15. Index

Learning Objectives

By the end of this section, you will be able to:

  • Determine if a sequence is geometric
  • Find the general term (nth term) of a geometric sequence
  • Find the sum of the first nn terms of a geometric sequence
  • Find the sum of an infinite geometric series
  • Apply geometric sequences and series in the real world
Be Prepared 12.7

Before you get started, take this readiness quiz.

Simplify: 2432.2432.
If you missed this problem, review Example 1.24.

Be Prepared 12.8

Evaluate: 3434 (12)4.(12)4.
If you missed this problem, review Example 1.19.

Be Prepared 12.9

If f(x)=4·3x,f(x)=4·3x, find f(1)f(1) f(2)f(2) f(3).f(3).
If you missed this problem, review Example 3.49.

Determine if a Sequence is Geometric

We are now ready to look at the second special type of sequence, the geometric sequence.

A sequence is called a geometric sequence if the ratio between consecutive terms is always the same. The ratio between consecutive terms in a geometric sequence is r, the common ratio, where n is greater than or equal to two.

Geometric Sequence

A geometric sequence is a sequence where the ratio between consecutive terms is always the same.

The ratio between consecutive terms, anan1,anan1, is r, the common ratio. n is greater than or equal to two.

Consider these sequences.

This figure shows two sets of sequences where r is the common ratio.

Example 12.21

Determine if each sequence is geometric. If so, indicate the common ratio.

4,8,16,32,64,128,4,8,16,32,64,128,

−2,6,−12,36,−72,216,−2,6,−12,36,−72,216,

27,9,3,1,13,19,27,9,3,1,13,19,

Try It 12.41

Determine if each sequence is geometric. If so indicate the common ratio.

7,21,63,189,567,1,701,7,21,63,189,567,1,701,

64,16,4,1,14,116,64,16,4,1,14,116,

2,4,12,48,240,1,440,2,4,12,48,240,1,440,

Try It 12.42

Determine if each sequence is geometric. If so indicate the common ratio.

−150,−30,−15,−5,52,0,−150,−30,−15,−5,52,0,

5,10,20,40,80,160,5,10,20,40,80,160,

8,4,2,1,12,14,8,4,2,1,12,14,

If we know the first term, a1,a1, and the common ratio, r, we can list a finite number of terms of the sequence.

Example 12.22

Write the first five terms of the sequence where the first term is 3 and the common ratio is r=−2.r=−2.

Try It 12.43

Write the first five terms of the sequence where the first term is 7 and the common ratio is r=−3.r=−3.

Try It 12.44

Write the first five terms of the sequence where the first term is 6 and the common ratio is r=−4.r=−4.

Find the General Term (nth Term) of a Geometric Sequence

Just as we found a formula for the general term of a sequence and an arithmetic sequence, we can also find a formula for the general term of a geometric sequence.

Let’s write the first few terms of the sequence where the first term is a1a1 and the common ratio is r. We will then look for a pattern.

This figure shows an image of a geometric sequence.

As we look for a pattern in the five terms above, we see that each of the terms starts with a1.a1.

The first term, a1,a1, is not multiplied by any r. In the second term, the a1a1 is multiplied by r. In the third term, the a1a1 is multiplied by r two times (r·rr·r or r2r2). In the fourth term, the a1a1 is multiplied by r three times (r·r·rr·r·r or r3r3) and in the fifth term, the a1a1 is multiplied by r four times. In each term, the number of times a1a1 is multiplied by r is one less than the number of the term. This leads us to the following

an=a1rn1an=a1rn1

General Term (nth term) of a Geometric Sequence

The general term of a geometric sequence with first term a1a1 and the common ratio r is

an=a1rn1an=a1rn1

We will use this formula in the next example to find the fourteenth term of a sequence.

Example 12.23

Find the fourteenth term of a sequence where the first term is 64 and the common ratio is r=12.r=12.

Try It 12.45

Find the thirteenth term of a sequence where the first term is 81 and the common ratio is r=13.r=13.

Try It 12.46

Find the twelfth term of a sequence where the first term is 256 and the common ratio is r=14.r=14.

Sometimes we do not know the common ratio and we must use the given information to find it before we find the requested term.

Example 12.24

Find the twelfth term of the sequence 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 96, … Find the general term for the sequence.

Try It 12.47

Find the ninth term of the sequence 6, 18, 54, 162, 486, 1,458, … Then find the general term for the sequence.

Try It 12.48

Find the eleventh term of the sequence 7, 14, 28, 56, 112, 224, … Then find the general term for the sequence.

Find the Sum of the First n Terms of a Geometric Sequence

We found the sum of both general sequences and arithmetic sequence. We will now do the same for geometric sequences. The sum,Sn,Sn, of the first n terms of a geometric sequence is written as Sn=a1+a2+a3+...+an.Sn=a1+a2+a3+...+an. We can write this sum by starting with the first term, a1,a1, and keep multiplying by r to get the next term as:

Sn=a1+a1r+a1r2+...+a1rn1Sn=a1+a1r+a1r2+...+a1rn1

Let’s also multiply both sides of the equation by r.

rSn=a1r+a1r2+a1r3+...+a1rnrSn=a1r+a1r2+a1r3+...+a1rn

Next, we subtract these equations. We will see that when we subtract, all but the first term of the top equation and the last term of the bottom equation subtract to zero.

Sn=a1+a1r+a1r2+a1r3++a1rn1rSn=a1r+a1r2+a1r3++a1rn1+a1rn____________________________________________________SnrSn=a1−a1rnSn=a1+a1r+a1r2+a1r3++a1rn1rSn=a1r+a1r2+a1r3++a1rn1+a1rn____________________________________________________SnrSn=a1−a1rn
We factor both sides. Sn(1r)=a1(1rn)Sn(1r)=a1(1rn)
To obtain the formula for Sn,Sn,
divide both sides by (1r).(1r).
Sn=a1(1rn)1rSn=a1(1rn)1r

Sum of the First n Terms of a Geometric Series

The sum, Sn,Sn, of the first n terms of a geometric sequence is

Sn=a1(1rn)1rSn=a1(1rn)1r

where a1a1 is the first term and r is the common ratio, and r is not equal to one.

We apply this formula in the next example where the first few terms of the sequence are given. Notice the sum of a geometric sequence typically gets very large when the common ratio is greater than one.

Example 12.25

Find the sum of the first 20 terms of the geometric sequence 7, 14, 28, 56, 112, 224, …

Try It 12.49

Find the sum of the first 20 terms of the geometric sequence 3, 6, 12, 24, 48, 96, …

Try It 12.50

Find the sum of the first 20 terms of the geometric sequence 6, 18, 54, 162, 486, 1,458, …

In the next example, we are given the sum in summation notation. While adding all the terms might be possible, most often it is easiest to use the formula to find the sum of the first n terms.

To use the formula, we need r. We can find it by writing out the first few terms of the sequence and find their ratio. Another option is to realize that in summation notation, a sequence is written in the form i=1ka(r)i,i=1ka(r)i, where r is the common ratio.

Example 12.26

Find the sum: i=1152(3)i.i=1152(3)i.

Try It 12.51

Find the sum: i=1156(2)i.i=1156(2)i.

Try It 12.52

Find the sum: i=1105(2)i.i=1105(2)i.

Find the Sum of an Infinite Geometric Series

If we take a geometric sequence and add the terms, we have a sum that is called a geometric series. An infinite geometric series is an infinite sum whose first term is a1a1 and common ratio is r and is written

a1+a1r+a1r2++a1rn1+a1+a1r+a1r2++a1rn1+

Infinite Geometric Series

An infinite geometric series is an infinite sum whose first term is a1a1 and common ratio is r and is written

a1+a1r+a1r2++a1rn1+a1+a1r+a1r2++a1rn1+

We know how to find the sum of the first n terms of a geometric series using the formula, Sn=a1(1rn)1r.Sn=a1(1rn)1r. But how do we find the sum of an infinite sum?

Let’s look at the infinite geometric series 3+6+12+24+48+96+.3+6+12+24+48+96+. Each term gets larger and larger so it makes sense that the sum of the infinite number of terms gets larger. Let’s look at a few partial sums for this series. We see a1=3a1=3 and r=2r=2

Sn=a1(1rn)1rSn=a1(1rn)1rSn=a1(1rn)1r S10=3(1210)12S30=3(1230)12S50=3(1250)12 S10=3,069S30=3,221,225,469S503.38×1015Sn=a1(1rn)1rSn=a1(1rn)1rSn=a1(1rn)1r S10=3(1210)12S30=3(1230)12S50=3(1250)12 S10=3,069S30=3,221,225,469S503.38×1015

As n gets larger and larger, the sum gets larger and larger. This is true when |r|1|r|1 and we call the series divergent. We cannot find a sum of an infinite geometric series when |r|1.|r|1.

Let’s look at an infinite geometric series whose common ratio is a fraction less than one,
12+14+18+116+132+164+12+14+18+116+132+164+. Here the terms get smaller and smaller as n gets larger. Let’s look at a few finite sums for this series. We see a1=12a1=12 and r=12.r=12.

Sn=a1(1rn)1rSn=a1(1rn)1rSn=a1(1rn)1r S10=12(1(12)10)112S20=12(1(12)20)112S30=12(1(12)30)112 S10.9990234375S200.9999990463S300.9999999991Sn=a1(1rn)1rSn=a1(1rn)1rSn=a1(1rn)1r S10=12(1(12)10)112S20=12(1(12)20)112S30=12(1(12)30)112 S10.9990234375S200.9999990463S300.9999999991

Notice the sum gets larger and larger but also gets closer and closer to one. When |r|<1,|r|<1, the expression rnrn gets smaller and smaller. In this case, we call the series convergent. As n approaches infinity, (gets infinitely large), rnrn gets closer and closer to zero. In our sum formula, we can replace the rnrn with zero and then we get a formula for the sum, S, for an infinite geometric series when |r|<1.|r|<1.

Sn=a1(1rn)1rS=a1(10)1rS=a11rSn=a1(1rn)1rS=a1(10)1rS=a11r

This formula gives us the sum of the infinite geometric sequence. Notice the S does not have the subscript n as in SnSn as we are not adding a finite number of terms.

Sum of an Infinite Geometric Series

For an infinite geometric series whose first term is a1a1 and common ratio r,

If|r|<1,the sum isIf|r|<1,the sum is

S=a11rS=a11r

If|r|1,the infinite geometric series does not have a sum. We say the series diverges.If|r|1,the infinite geometric series does not have a sum. We say the series diverges.

Example 12.27

Find the sum of the infinite geometric series 54+18+6+2+23+29+54+18+6+2+23+29+

Try It 12.53

Find the sum of the infinite geometric series 48+24+12+6+3+32+48+24+12+6+3+32+

Try It 12.54

Find the sum of the infinite geometric series 64+16+4+1+14+116+64+16+4+1+14+116+

An interesting use of infinite geometric series is to write a repeating decimal as a fraction.

Example 12.28

Write the repeating decimal 0.50.5 as a fraction.

Try It 12.55

Write the repeating decimal 0.40.4 as a fraction.

Try It 12.56

Write the repeating decimal 0.80.8 as a fraction.

Apply Geometric Sequences and Series in the Real World

One application of geometric sequences has to do with consumer spending. If a tax rebate is given to each household, the effect on the economy is many times the amount of the individual rebate.

Example 12.29

The government has decided to give a $1,000 tax rebate to each household in order to stimulate the economy. The government statistics say that each household will spend 80% of the rebate in goods and services. The businesses and individuals who benefitted from that 80% will then spend 80% of what they received and so on. The result is called the multiplier effect. What is the total effect of the rebate on the economy?

Try It 12.57

What is the total effect on the economy of a government tax rebate of $1,000 to each household in order to stimulate the economy if each household will spend 90% of the rebate in goods and services?

Try It 12.58

What is the total effect on the economy of a government tax rebate of $500 to each household in order to stimulate the economy if each household will spend 85% of the rebate in goods and services?

We have looked at a compound interest formula where a principal, P, is invested at an interest rate, r, for t years. The new balance, A, is A=P(1+rn)ntA=P(1+rn)nt when interest is compounded n times a year. This formula applies when a lump sum was invested upfront and tells us the value after a certain time period.

An annuity is an investment that is a sequence of equal periodic deposits. We will be looking at annuities that pay the interest at the time of the deposits. As we develop the formula for the value of an annuity, we are going to let n=1.n=1. That means there is one deposit per year.

A=P(1+rn)ntA=P(1+rn)nt
Let n=1.n=1. A=P(1+r1)1tA=P(1+r1)1t
Simplify. A=P(1+r)tA=P(1+r)t

Suppose P dollars is invested at the end of each year. One year later that deposit is worth P(1+r)1P(1+r)1 dollars, and another year later it is worth P(1+r)2P(1+r)2 dollars. After t years, it will be worth A=P(1+r)tA=P(1+r)t dollars.

End of year 1 End of year 2 End of year 3
First Deposit P
@ end of year 1
P Amount 1 year later
P(1+r)1P(1+r)1
Amount 2 years later
P(1+r)2P(1+r)2
2nd Deposit P
@ end of year 2
P Amount 1 year later
P(1+r)1P(1+r)1
3rd Deposit P
@ end of year 3
P

After three years, the value of the annuity is

P plus P times the quantity 1 plus r in parentheses, to the first power, plus P times the quantity 1 plus r, in parentheses, squared. This equals the money deposited at the end of year three, plus the money deposited at the end of year two, plus the money deposited at the end of year 1.

This a sum of the terms of a geometric sequence where the first term is P and the common ratio is 1+r.1+r. We substitute these values into the sum formula. Be careful, we have two different uses of r. The r in the sum formula is the common ratio of the sequence. In this case, that is 1+r1+r where r is the interest rate.

St=a1(1rt)1rSt=a1(1rt)1r
Substitute in the values. St=P(1(1+r)t)1(1+r)St=P(1(1+r)t)1(1+r)
Simplify. St=P(1(1+r)t)rSt=P(1(1+r)t)r
St=P((1+r)t1)rSt=P((1+r)t1)r

Remember our premise was that one deposit was made at the end of each year.

We can adapt this formula for n deposits made per year and the interest is compounded n times a year.

Value of an Annuity with Interest Compounded nn Times a Year

For a principal, P, invested at the end of a compounding period, with an interest rate, r, which is compounded n times a year, the new balance, A, after t years, is

At=P((1+rn)nt1)rnAt=P((1+rn)nt1)rn

Example 12.30

New parents decide to invest $100 per month in an annuity for their baby daughter. The account will pay 5% interest per year which is compounded monthly. How much will be in the child’s account at her eighteenth birthday?

Try It 12.59

New grandparents decide to invest $200 per month in an annuity for their grandson. The account will pay 5% interest per year which is compounded monthly. How much will be in the child’s account at his twenty-first birthday?

Try It 12.60

Arturo just got his first full-time job after graduating from college at age 27. He decided to invest $200 per month in an IRA (an annuity). The interest on the annuity is 8%, which is compounded monthly. How much will be in the Arturo’s account when he retires at his sixty-seventh birthday?

Media Access Additional Online Resources

Access these online resources for additional instruction and practice with sequences.

Section 12.3 Exercises

Practice Makes Perfect

Determine if a Sequence is Geometric

In the following exercises, determine if the sequence is geometric, and if so, indicate the common ratio.

127.

3,12,48,192,768,3072,3,12,48,192,768,3072,

128.

2,10,50,250,1250,6250,2,10,50,250,1250,6250,

129.

48,24,12,6,3,32,48,24,12,6,3,32,

130.

54,18,6,2,23,29,54,18,6,2,23,29,

131.

−3,6,−12,24,−48,96,−3,6,−12,24,−48,96,

132.

2,−6,18,−54,162,−486,2,−6,18,−54,162,−486,

In the following exercises, determine if each sequence is arithmetic, geometric or neither. If arithmetic, indicate the common difference. If geometric, indicate the common ratio.

133.

48,24,12,6,3,32,48,24,12,6,3,32,

134.

12,6,0,−6,−12,−18,12,6,0,−6,−12,−18,

135.

−7,−2,3,8,13,18,−7,−2,3,8,13,18,

136.

5,9,13,17,21,25,5,9,13,17,21,25,

137.

12,14,18,116,132,164,12,14,18,116,132,164,

138.

4,8,12,24,48,96,4,8,12,24,48,96,

In the following exercises, write the first five terms of each geometric sequence with the given first term and common ratio.

139.

a1=4a1=4 and r=3r=3

140.

a1=9a1=9 and r=2r=2

141.

a1=−4a1=−4 and r=−2r=−2

142.

a1=−5a1=−5 and r=−3r=−3

143.

a1=27a1=27 and r=13r=13

144.

a1=64a1=64 and r=14r=14

Find the General Term (nth Term) of a Geometric Sequence

In the following exercises, find the indicated term of a sequence where the first term and the common ratio is given.

145.

Find a11a11 given a1=8a1=8 and r=3.r=3.

146.

Find a13a13 given a1=7a1=7 and r=2.r=2.

147.

Find a10a10 given a1=−6a1=−6 and r=−2.r=−2.

148.

Find a15a15 given a1=−4a1=−4 and r=−3.r=−3.

149.

Find a10a10 given a1=100,000a1=100,000 and r=0.1.r=0.1.

150.

Find a8a8 given a1=1,000,000a1=1,000,000 and r=0.01.r=0.01.

In the following exercises, find the indicated term of the given sequence. Find the general term for the sequence.

151.

Find a9a9 of the sequence, 9,18,36,72,144,288,9,18,36,72,144,288,

152.

Find a12a12 of the sequence, 5,15,45,135,405,1215,5,15,45,135,405,1215,

153.

Find a15a15 of the sequence, −486,162,−54,18,−6,2,−486,162,−54,18,−6,2,

154.

Find a16a16 of the sequence, 224,−112,56,−28,14,−7,224,−112,56,−28,14,−7,

155.

Find a10a10 of the sequence, 1,0.1,0.01,0.001,0.0001,0.00001,1,0.1,0.01,0.001,0.0001,0.00001,

156.

Find a9a9 of the sequence, 1000,100,10,1,0.1,0.01,1000,100,10,1,0.1,0.01,

Find the Sum of the First n terms of a Geometric Sequence

In the following exercises, find the sum of the first fifteen terms of each geometric sequence.

157.

8,24,72,216,648,1944,8,24,72,216,648,1944,

158.

7,14,28,56,112,224,7,14,28,56,112,224,

159.

−6,12,−24,48,−96,192,−6,12,−24,48,−96,192,

160.

−4,12,−36,108,−324,972,−4,12,−36,108,−324,972,

161.

81,27,9,3,1,13,81,27,9,3,1,13,

162.

256,64,16,4,1,14,116,256,64,16,4,1,14,116,

In the following exercises, find the sum of the geometric sequence.

163.

i=115(2)ii=115(2)i

164.

i=110(3)ii=110(3)i

165.

i=194(2)ii=194(2)i

166.

i=185(3)ii=185(3)i

167.

i=1109(13)ii=1109(13)i

168.

i=1154(12)ii=1154(12)i

Find the Sum of an Infinite Geometric Series

In the following exercises, find the sum of each infinite geometric series.

169.

1+13+19+127+181+1243+1729+1+13+19+127+181+1243+1729+

170.

1+12+14+18+116+132+164+1+12+14+18+116+132+164+

171.

62+2329+227281+62+2329+227281+

172.

−4+21+1214+18−4+21+1214+18

173.

6+12+24+48+96+192+6+12+24+48+96+192+

174.

5+15+45+135+405+1215+5+15+45+135+405+1215+

175.

1,024+512+256+128+64+32+1,024+512+256+128+64+32+

176.

6,561+2187+729+243+81+27+6,561+2187+729+243+81+27+

In the following exercises, write each repeating decimal as a fraction.

177.

0.30.3

178.

0.60.6

179.

0.70.7

180.

0.20.2

181.

0.450.45

182.

0.270.27

Apply Geometric Sequences and Series in the Real World

In the following exercises, solve the problem.

183.

Find the total effect on the economy of each government tax rebate to each household in order to stimulate the economy if each household will spend the indicated percent of the rebate in goods and services.

Tax rebate to each household Percent spent on goods and services Total Effect on the economy
$1,000$1,000 85%85%
$1,000$1,000 75%75%
$1,500$1,500 90%90%
$1,500$1,500 80%80%
184.

New grandparents decide to invest $100$100 per month in an annuity for their grandchild. The account will pay 6%6% interest per year which is compounded monthly (12 times a year). How much will be in the child’s account at their twenty-first birthday?

185.

Berenice just got her first full-time job after graduating from college at age 30. She decided to invest $500$500 per quarter in an IRA (an annuity). The interest on the annuity is 7%7% which is compounded quarterly (4 times a year). How much will be in the Berenice’s account when she retires at age 65?

186.

Alice wants to purchase a home in about five years. She is depositing $500$500 a month into an annuity that earns 5%5% per year that is compounded monthly (12 times a year). How much will Alice have for her down payment in five years?

187.

Myra just got her first full-time job after graduating from college. She plans to get a master’s degree, and so is depositing $2,500$2,500 a year from her year-end bonus into an annuity. The annuity pays 6.5%6.5% per year and is compounded yearly. How much will she have saved in five years to pursue her master’s degree?

Writing Exercises

188.

In your own words, explain how to determine whether a sequence is geometric.

189.

In your own words, explain how to find the general term of a geometric sequence.

190.

In your own words, explain the difference between a geometric sequence and a geometric series.

191.

In your own words, explain how to determine if an infinite geometric series has a sum and how to find it.

Self Check

This figure shows seven rows and four columns. The first row is the header row and reads, “I can”, “Confidently”, “With some help”, and “No, I don’t get it. The first column reads, “Determine if a sequence is geometric”, “Find the general term (nth term) of a”, “Geometric sequence”, “Find the sum of an Infinite geometric series”, Use geometric sequences to solve applications”. The remaining columns are blank.

After completing the exercises, use this checklist to evaluate your mastery of the objectives of this section.

What does this checklist tell you about your mastery of this section? What steps will you take to improve?

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