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  1. Preface
  2. 1 Foundations
    1. Introduction
    2. 1.1 Use the Language of Algebra
    3. 1.2 Integers
    4. 1.3 Fractions
    5. 1.4 Decimals
    6. 1.5 Properties of Real Numbers
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  3. 2 Solving Linear Equations
    1. Introduction
    2. 2.1 Use a General Strategy to Solve Linear Equations
    3. 2.2 Use a Problem Solving Strategy
    4. 2.3 Solve a Formula for a Specific Variable
    5. 2.4 Solve Mixture and Uniform Motion Applications
    6. 2.5 Solve Linear Inequalities
    7. 2.6 Solve Compound Inequalities
    8. 2.7 Solve Absolute Value Inequalities
    9. Key Terms
    10. Key Concepts
    11. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  4. 3 Graphs and Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 3.1 Graph Linear Equations in Two Variables
    3. 3.2 Slope of a Line
    4. 3.3 Find the Equation of a Line
    5. 3.4 Graph Linear Inequalities in Two Variables
    6. 3.5 Relations and Functions
    7. 3.6 Graphs of Functions
    8. Key Terms
    9. Key Concepts
    10. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  5. 4 Systems of Linear Equations
    1. Introduction
    2. 4.1 Solve Systems of Linear Equations with Two Variables
    3. 4.2 Solve Applications with Systems of Equations
    4. 4.3 Solve Mixture Applications with Systems of Equations
    5. 4.4 Solve Systems of Equations with Three Variables
    6. 4.5 Solve Systems of Equations Using Matrices
    7. 4.6 Solve Systems of Equations Using Determinants
    8. 4.7 Graphing Systems of Linear Inequalities
    9. Key Terms
    10. Key Concepts
    11. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  6. 5 Polynomials and Polynomial Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 5.1 Add and Subtract Polynomials
    3. 5.2 Properties of Exponents and Scientific Notation
    4. 5.3 Multiply Polynomials
    5. 5.4 Dividing Polynomials
    6. Key Terms
    7. Key Concepts
    8. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  7. 6 Factoring
    1. Introduction to Factoring
    2. 6.1 Greatest Common Factor and Factor by Grouping
    3. 6.2 Factor Trinomials
    4. 6.3 Factor Special Products
    5. 6.4 General Strategy for Factoring Polynomials
    6. 6.5 Polynomial Equations
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  8. 7 Rational Expressions and Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 7.1 Multiply and Divide Rational Expressions
    3. 7.2 Add and Subtract Rational Expressions
    4. 7.3 Simplify Complex Rational Expressions
    5. 7.4 Solve Rational Equations
    6. 7.5 Solve Applications with Rational Equations
    7. 7.6 Solve Rational Inequalities
    8. Key Terms
    9. Key Concepts
    10. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  9. 8 Roots and Radicals
    1. Introduction
    2. 8.1 Simplify Expressions with Roots
    3. 8.2 Simplify Radical Expressions
    4. 8.3 Simplify Rational Exponents
    5. 8.4 Add, Subtract, and Multiply Radical Expressions
    6. 8.5 Divide Radical Expressions
    7. 8.6 Solve Radical Equations
    8. 8.7 Use Radicals in Functions
    9. 8.8 Use the Complex Number System
    10. Key Terms
    11. Key Concepts
    12. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  10. 9 Quadratic Equations and Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 9.1 Solve Quadratic Equations Using the Square Root Property
    3. 9.2 Solve Quadratic Equations by Completing the Square
    4. 9.3 Solve Quadratic Equations Using the Quadratic Formula
    5. 9.4 Solve Quadratic Equations in Quadratic Form
    6. 9.5 Solve Applications of Quadratic Equations
    7. 9.6 Graph Quadratic Functions Using Properties
    8. 9.7 Graph Quadratic Functions Using Transformations
    9. 9.8 Solve Quadratic Inequalities
    10. Key Terms
    11. Key Concepts
    12. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  11. 10 Exponential and Logarithmic Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 10.1 Finding Composite and Inverse Functions
    3. 10.2 Evaluate and Graph Exponential Functions
    4. 10.3 Evaluate and Graph Logarithmic Functions
    5. 10.4 Use the Properties of Logarithms
    6. 10.5 Solve Exponential and Logarithmic Equations
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  12. 11 Conics
    1. Introduction
    2. 11.1 Distance and Midpoint Formulas; Circles
    3. 11.2 Parabolas
    4. 11.3 Ellipses
    5. 11.4 Hyperbolas
    6. 11.5 Solve Systems of Nonlinear Equations
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  13. 12 Sequences, Series and Binomial Theorem
    1. Introduction
    2. 12.1 Sequences
    3. 12.2 Arithmetic Sequences
    4. 12.3 Geometric Sequences and Series
    5. 12.4 Binomial Theorem
    6. Key Terms
    7. Key Concepts
    8. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  14. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
    12. Chapter 12
  15. Index

Learning Objectives

By the end of this section, you will be able to:
  • Simplify expressions with absolute value
  • Add and subtract integers
  • Multiply and divide integers
  • Simplify expressions with integers
  • Evaluate variable expressions with integers
  • Translate phrases to expressions with integers
  • Use integers in applications
Be Prepared 1.2

A more thorough introduction to the topics covered in this section can be found in the Elementary Algebra 2e chapter, Foundations.

Simplify Expressions with Absolute Value

A negative number is a number less than 0. The negative numbers are to the left of zero on the number line. See Figure 1.2.

Figure shows a horizontal line marked with numbers at equal distances. At the center of the line is 0. To the right of this, starting from the number closest to 0 are 1, 2, 3 and 4. These are labeled positive numbers. To the left of 0, starting from the number closest to 0 are minus 1, minus 2, minus 3 and minus 4. These are labeled negative numbers.
Figure 1.2 The number line shows the location of positive and negative numbers.

You may have noticed that, on the number line, the negative numbers are a mirror image of the positive numbers, with zero in the middle. Because the numbers 22 and −2−2 are the same distance from zero, each one is called the opposite of the other. The opposite of 22 is −2,−2, and the opposite of −2−2 is 2.2.

Opposite

The opposite of a number is the number that is the same distance from zero on the number line but on the opposite side of zero.

Figure 1.3 illustrates the definition.

Figure shows a number line with the numbers 3 and minus 3 highlighted. These are equidistant from 0, both being 3 numbers away from 0.
Figure 1.3 The opposite of 3 is −3−3.

Opposite Notation

ameans the opposite of the numbera The notationais read as “the opposite ofa.”ameans the opposite of the numbera The notationais read as “the opposite ofa.”

We saw that numbers such as 3 and −3−3 are opposites because they are the same distance from 0 on the number line. They are both three units from 0. The distance between 0 and any number on the number line is called the absolute value of that number.

Absolute Value

The absolute value of a number is its distance from 0 on the number line.

The absolute value of a number nn is written as |n||n| and |n|0|n|0 for all numbers.

Absolute values are always greater than or equal to zero.

For example,

−5is 5 units away from 0, so|−5|=5. 5 is 5 units away from 0, so|5|=5.−5is 5 units away from 0, so|−5|=5. 5 is 5 units away from 0, so|5|=5.

Figure 1.4 illustrates this idea.

Figure shows a number line showing the numbers 0, 5 and minus 5. 5 and minus 5 are equidistant from 0, both being 5 units away from 0.
Figure 1.4 The numbers 5 and −5−5 are 5 units away from 0.

The absolute value of a number is never negative because distance cannot be negative. The only number with absolute value equal to zero is the number zero itself because the distance from 0 to 0 on the number line is zero units.

In the next example, we’ll order expressions with absolute values.

Example 1.12

Fill in <,>,<,>, or == for each of the following pairs of numbers:

|−5|__|−5||−5|__|−5| 8__|−8|8__|−8| −9__|−9|−9__|−9| (−16)__|−16|.(−16)__|−16|.

Try It 1.23

Fill in <,>,<,>, or == for each of the following pairs of numbers:

−9__|−9|−9__|−9| 2__|−2|2__|−2| −8__|−8|−8__|−8| (−9)__|−9|.(−9)__|−9|.

Try It 1.24

Fill in <,>,<,>, or == for each of the following pairs of numbers:

7__|−7|7__|−7| (−10)__|−10|(−10)__|−10| |−4|__|−4||−4|__|−4| −1__|−1|.−1__|−1|.

We now add absolute value bars to our list of grouping symbols. When we use the order of operations, first we simplify inside the absolute value bars as much as possible, then we take the absolute value of the resulting number.

Grouping Symbols

Parentheses()Braces{} Brackets[]Absolute value||Parentheses()Braces{} Brackets[]Absolute value||

In the next example, we simplify the expressions inside absolute value bars first just as we do with parentheses.

Example 1.13

Simplify: 24|193(62)|.24|193(62)|.

Try It 1.25

Simplify:19|114(31)|.19|114(31)|.

Try It 1.26

Simplify: 9|84(75)|.9|84(75)|.

Add and Subtract Integers

So far, we have only used the counting numbers and the whole numbers.

Counting numbers1,2,3 Whole numbers0,1,2,3….Counting numbers1,2,3 Whole numbers0,1,2,3….

Our work with opposites gives us a way to define the integers. The whole numbers and their opposites are called the integers. The integers are the numbers −3,−2,−1,0,1,2,3−3,−2,−1,0,1,2,3

Integers

The whole numbers and their opposites are called the integers.

The integers are the numbers

−3,−2,−1,0,1,2,3…,−3,−2,−1,0,1,2,3…,

Most students are comfortable with the addition and subtraction facts for positive numbers. But doing addition or subtraction with both positive and negative numbers may be more challenging.

We will use two color counters to model addition and subtraction of negatives so that you can visualize the procedures instead of memorizing the rules.

We let one color (blue) represent positive. The other color (red) will represent the negatives.

Figure show two circles labeled positive blue and negative red.

If we have one positive counter and one negative counter, the value of the pair is zero. They form a neutral pair. The value of this neutral pair is zero.

Figure shows a blue circle and a red circle encircled in a larger shape. This is labeled 1 plus minus 1 equals 0.

We will use the counters to show how to add:

5+3−5+(−3)−5+35+(−3)5+3−5+(−3)−5+35+(−3)

The first example, 5+3, 5+3, adds 5 positives and 3 positives—both positives.

The second example, −5+(−3),−5+(−3), adds 5 negatives and 3 negatives—both negatives.

When the signs are the same, the counters are all the same color, and so we add them. In each case we get 8—either 8 positives or 8 negatives.

Figure on the left is labeled 5 plus 3. It shows 8 blue circles. 5 plus 3 equals 8. Figure on the right is labeled minus 5 plus open parentheses minus 3 close parentheses. It shows 8 blue circles labeled 8 negatives. Minus 5 plus open parentheses minus 3 close parentheses equals minus 8.

So what happens when the signs are different? Let’s add −5+3−5+3 and 5+(−3).5+(−3).

When we use counters to model addition of positive and negative integers, it is easy to see whether there are more positive or more negative counters. So we know whether the sum will be positive or negative.

Figure on the left is labeled minus 5 plus 3. It has 5 red circles and 3 blue circles. Three pairs of red and blue circles are formed. More negatives means the sum is negative. The figure on the right is labeled 5 plus minus 3. It has 5 blue and 3 red circles. Three pairs of red and blue circles are formed. More positives means the sum is positive.

Example 1.14

Add: −1+(−4)−1+(−4) −1+5−1+5 1+(−5).1+(−5).

Try It 1.27

Add: −2+(−4)−2+(−4) −2+4−2+4 2+(−4).2+(−4).

Try It 1.28

Add: −2+(−5)−2+(−5) −2+5−2+5 2+(−5).2+(−5).

We will continue to use counters to model the subtraction. Perhaps when you were younger, you read 5353 as “5 take away 3.” When you use counters, you can think of subtraction the same way!

We will use the counters to show to subtract:

53 −5(−3) −53 5(−3) 53 −5(−3) −53 5(−3)

The first example, 53,53, we subtract 3 positives from 5 positives and end up with 2 positives.

In the second example, −5(−3),−5(−3), we subtract 3 negatives from 5 negatives and end up with 2 negatives.

Each example used counters of only one color, and the “take away” model of subtraction was easy to apply.

Figure on the left is labeled 5 minus 3 equals 2. There are 5 blue circles. Three of these are encircled and an arrow indicates that they are taken away. The figure on the right is labeled minus 5 minus open parentheses minus 3 close parentheses equals minus 2. There are 5 red circles. Three of these are encircled and an arrow indicates that they are taken away.

What happens when we have to subtract one positive and one negative number? We’ll need to use both blue and red counters as well as some neutral pairs. If we don’t have the number of counters needed to take away, we add neutral pairs. Adding a neutral pair does not change the value. It is like changing quarters to nickels—the value is the same, but it looks different.

Let’s look at −53−53 and 5(−3).5(−3).

. .
Model the first number. . .
We now add the needed neutral pairs. . .
We remove the number of counters modeled by the second number. . .
Count what is left. . .
. .
. .

Example 1.15

Subtract: 3131 −3(−1)−3(−1) −31−31 3(−1).3(−1).

Try It 1.29

Subtract: 6464 −6(−4)−6(−4) −64−64 6(−4).6(−4).

Try It 1.30

Subtract: 7474 −7(−4)−7(−4) −74−74 7(−4).7(−4).

Have you noticed that subtraction of signed numbers can be done by adding the opposite? In the last example, −31−31 is the same as −3+(−1)−3+(−1) and 3(−1)3(−1) is the same as 3+1.3+1. You will often see this idea, the Subtraction Property, written as follows:

Subtraction Property

ab=a+(b)ab=a+(b)

Subtracting a number is the same as adding its opposite.

Example 1.16

Simplify: 138138 and 13+(−8)13+(−8) −179−179 and −17+(−9)−17+(−9) 9(−15)9(−15) and 9+159+15 −7(−4)−7(−4) and −7+4.−7+4.

Try It 1.31

Simplify: 21132113 and 21+(−13)21+(−13) −117−117 and −11+(−7)−11+(−7) 6(−13)6(−13) and 6+136+13 −5(−1)−5(−1) and −5+1.−5+1.

Try It 1.32

Simplify: 157157 and 15+(−7)15+(−7) −148−148 and −14+(−8)−14+(−8) 4(−19)4(−19) and 4+194+19 −4(−7)−4(−7) and −4+7.−4+7.

What happens when there are more than three integers? We just use the order of operations as usual.

Example 1.17

Simplify: 7(−43)9.7(−43)9.

Try It 1.33

Simplify: 8(−31)9.8(−31)9.

Try It 1.34

Simplify: 12(−96)14.12(−96)14.

Multiply and Divide Integers

Since multiplication is mathematical shorthand for repeated addition, our model can easily be applied to show multiplication of integers. Let’s look at this concrete model to see what patterns we notice. We will use the same examples that we used for addition and subtraction. Here, we are using the model just to help us discover the pattern.

We remember that a·ba·b means add a, b times.

The figure on the left is labeled 5 dot 3. Here, we need to add 5, 3 times. Three rows of five blue counters each are shown. This makes 15 positives. Hence, 5 times 3 is 15. The figure on the right is labeled minus 5 open parentheses 3 close parentheses. Here we need to add minus 5, 3 times. Three rows of five red counters each are shown. This makes 15 negatives. Hence, minus 5 times 3 is minus 15.

The next two examples are more interesting. What does it mean to multiply 5 by −3?−3? It means subtract 5,35,3 times. Looking at subtraction as “taking away”, it means to take away 5, 3 times. But there is nothing to take away, so we start by adding neutral pairs on the workspace.

The figure on the left is labeled 5 open parentheses minus 3 close parentheses. We need to take away 5, three times. Three rows of five positive counters each and three rows of five negative counters each are shown. What is left is 15 negatives. Hence, 5 times minus 3 is minus 15. The figure on the right is labeled open parentheses minus 5 close parentheses open parentheses minus 3 close parentheses. We need to take away minus 5, three times. Three rows of five positive counters each and three rows of five negative counters each are shown. What is left is 15 positives. Hence, minus 5 times minus 3 is 15.

In summary:

5·3=15−5(3)=−15 5(−3)=−15(−5)(−3)=155·3=15−5(3)=−15 5(−3)=−15(−5)(−3)=15

Notice that for multiplication of two signed numbers, when the

signs are thesame, the product ispositive. signs aredifferent, the product isnegative.signs are thesame, the product ispositive. signs aredifferent, the product isnegative.

What about division? Division is the inverse operation of multiplication. So, 15÷3=515÷3=5 because 5·3=15.5·3=15. In words, this expression says that 15 can be divided into 3 groups of 5 each because adding five three times gives 15. If you look at some examples of multiplying integers, you might figure out the rules for dividing integers.

5·3=15so15÷3=5−5(3)=−15so−15÷3=−5 (−5)(−3)=15so15÷(−3)=−5 5(−3)=−15so−15÷(−3)=55·3=15so15÷3=5−5(3)=−15so−15÷3=−5 (−5)(−3)=15so15÷(−3)=−5 5(−3)=−15so−15÷(−3)=5

Division follows the same rules as multiplication with regard to signs.

Multiplication and Division of Signed Numbers

For multiplication and division of two signed numbers:

Same signs Result
•  Two positives Positive
•  Two negatives Positive

If the signs are the same, the result is positive.

Different signs Result
•  Positive and negative Negative
•  Negative and positive Negative

If the signs are different, the result is negative.

Example 1.18

Multiply or divide: −100÷(−4)−100÷(−4) 7·67·6 4(−8)4(−8) −27÷3.−27÷3.

Try It 1.35

Multiply or divide: −115÷(−5)−115÷(−5) 5·125·12 9(−7)9(−7) −63÷7.−63÷7.

Try It 1.36

Multiply or divide: −117÷(−3)−117÷(−3) 3·133·13 7(−4)7(−4) −42÷6.−42÷6.

When we multiply a number by 1, the result is the same number. Each time we multiply a number by −1,−1, we get its opposite!

Multiplication by −1−1

−1a=a−1a=a

Multiplying a number by −1−1 gives its opposite.

Simplify Expressions with Integers

What happens when there are more than two numbers in an expression? The order of operations still applies when negatives are included. Remember Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally?

Let’s try some examples. We’ll simplify expressions that use all four operations with integers—addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. Remember to follow the order of operations.

Example 1.19

Simplify: (−2)4(−2)4 24.24.

Try It 1.37

Simplify: (−3)4(−3)4 34.34.

Try It 1.38

Simplify: (−7)2(−7)2 72.72.

The last example showed us the difference between (−2)4(−2)4 and 24.24. This distinction is important to prevent future errors. The next example reminds us to multiply and divide in order left to right.

Example 1.20

Simplify: 8(−9)÷(−2)38(−9)÷(−2)3 −30÷2+(−3)(−7).−30÷2+(−3)(−7).

Try It 1.39

Simplify: 12(−9)÷(−3)312(−9)÷(−3)3 −27÷3+(−5)(−6).−27÷3+(−5)(−6).

Try It 1.40

Simplify: 18(−4)÷(−2)318(−4)÷(−2)3 −32÷4+(−2)(−7).−32÷4+(−2)(−7).

Evaluate Variable Expressions with Integers

Remember that to evaluate an expression means to substitute a number for the variable in the expression. Now we can use negative numbers as well as positive numbers.

Example 1.21

Evaluate 4x22xy+3y24x22xy+3y2 when x=2,y=−1.x=2,y=−1.

Try It 1.41

Evaluate: 3x22xy+6y23x22xy+6y2 when x=1,y=−2.x=1,y=−2.

Try It 1.42

Evaluate: 4x2xy+5y24x2xy+5y2 when x=−2,y=3.x=−2,y=3.

Translate Phrases to Expressions with Integers

Our earlier work translating English to algebra also applies to phrases that include both positive and negative numbers.

Example 1.22

Translate and simplify: the sum of 8 and −12,−12, increased by 3.3.

Try It 1.43

Translate and simplify the sum of 9 and −16,−16, increased by 4.

Try It 1.44

Translate and simplify the sum of −8−8 and −12,−12, increased by 7.

Use Integers in Applications

We’ll outline a plan to solve applications. It’s hard to find something if we don’t know what we’re looking for or what to call it! So when we solve an application, we first need to determine what the problem is asking us to find. Then we’ll write a phrase that gives the information to find it. We’ll translate the phrase into an expression and then simplify the expression to get the answer. Finally, we summarize the answer in a sentence to make sure it makes sense.

Example 1.23 How to Solve Application Problems Using Integers

In the morning, the temperature in Kendallville, Indiana was 11 degrees. By mid-afternoon, the temperature had dropped to −9−9 degrees. What was the difference in the morning and afternoon temperatures?

Figure shows a glass thermometer, with temperature markings ranging from minus 10 to 30. Two markings are highlighted, minus 9 degrees C and 11 degrees C.
Try It 1.45

In the morning, the temperature in Anchorage, Alaska was 1515 degrees. By mid-afternoon the temperature had dropped to 30 degrees below zero. What was the difference in the morning and afternoon temperatures?

Try It 1.46

The temperature in Denver was −6−6 degrees at lunchtime. By sunset the temperature had dropped to −15−15 degrees. What was the difference in the lunchtime and sunset temperatures?

How To

Use Integers in Applications.

  1. Step 1. Read the problem. Make sure all the words and ideas are understood.
  2. Step 2. Identify what we are asked to find.
  3. Step 3. Write a phrase that gives the information to find it.
  4. Step 4. Translate the phrase to an expression.
  5. Step 5. Simplify the expression.
  6. Step 6. Answer the question with a complete sentence.

Media Access Additional Online Resources

Access this online resource for additional instruction and practice with integers.

Section 1.2 Exercises

Practice Makes Perfect

Simplify Expressions with Absolute Value

In the following exercises, fill in <,>,<,>, or == for each of the following pairs of numbers.

59.


|−7|___|−7||−7|___|−7|
6___|−6|6___|−6|
|−11|___11|−11|___11
(−13)___|−13|(−13)___|−13|

60.


|−9|___|−9||−9|___|−9|
−8___|−8|−8___|−8|
|−1|___1|−1|___1
(−14)___|−14|(−14)___|−14|

61.


|2|___|−2||2|___|−2|
−12___|−12|−12___|−12|
|−3|___3|−3|___3
|−19|___(−19)|−19|___(−19)

62.


|−4|___|4||−4|___|4|
5___|−5|5___|−5|
|−10|___10|−10|___10
|−0|___(−0)|−0|___(−0)

In the following exercises, simplify.

63.

|157||146||157||146|

64.

|178||134||178||134|

65.

18|2(83)|18|2(83)|

66.

15|3(85)|15|3(85)|

67.

18|124(41)+3|18|124(41)+3|

68.

27|19+4(31)7|27|19+4(31)7|

69.

103|93(31)|103|93(31)|

70.

132|112(52)|132|112(52)|

Add and Subtract Integers

In the following exercises, simplify each expression.

71.


−7+(−4)−7+(−4)
−7+4−7+4
7+(−4).7+(−4).

72.


−5+(−9)−5+(−9)
−5+9−5+9
5+(−9)5+(−9)

73.

48+(−16)48+(−16)

74.

34+(−19)34+(−19)

75.

−14+(−12)+4−14+(−12)+4

76.

−17+(−18)+6−17+(−18)+6

77.

19+2(−3+8)19+2(−3+8)

78.

24+3(−5+9)24+3(−5+9)

79.


137137
−13(−7)−13(−7)
−137−137
13(−7)13(−7)

80.


158158
−15(−8)−15(−8)
−158−158
15(−8)15(−8)

81.

−1742−1742

82.

−58(−67)−58(−67)

83.

−14(−27)+9−14(−27)+9

84.

64+(−17)964+(−17)9

85.

44284428 44+(−28)44+(−28)

86.

35163516 35+(−16)35+(−16)

87.

27(−18)27(−18) 27+1827+18

88.

46(−37)46(−37) 46+3746+37

89.

(27)(38)(27)(38)

90.

(18)(29)(18)(29)

91.

(68)(24)(68)(24)

92.

(45)(78)(45)(78)

93.

25[10(312)]25[10(312)]

94.

32[5(1520)]32[5(1520)]

Multiply and Divide Integers

In the following exercises, multiply or divide.

95.


−4·8−4·8
13(−5)13(−5)
−24÷6−24÷6
−52÷(−4)−52÷(−4)

96.


−3·9−3·9
9(−7)9(−7)
35÷(−7)35÷(−7)
−84÷(−6)−84÷(−6)

97.


−28÷7−28÷7
−180÷15−180÷15
3(−13)3(−13)
−1(−14)−1(−14)

98.


−36÷4−36÷4
−192÷12−192÷12
9(−7)9(−7)
−1(−19)−1(−19)

Simplify and Evaluate Expressions with Integers

In the following exercises, simplify each expression.

99.

(−2)6(−2)6 2626

100.

(−3)5(−3)5 3535

101.

5(−6)+7(−2)35(−6)+7(−2)3

102.

8(−4)+5(−4)68(−4)+5(−4)6

103.

−3(−5)(6)−3(−5)(6)

104.

−4(−6)(3)−4(−6)(3)

105.

(811)(912)(811)(912)

106.

(611)(813)(611)(813)

107.

263(27)263(27)

108.

232(46)232(46)

109.

65÷(−5)+(−28)÷(−7)65÷(−5)+(−28)÷(−7)

110.

52÷(−4)+(−32)÷(−8)52÷(−4)+(−32)÷(−8)

111.

92[38(−2)]92[38(−2)]

112.

113[74(−2)]113[74(−2)]

113.

8|24(41)+3|8|24(41)+3|

114.

7|53(41)6|7|53(41)6|

115.

93|2(26)(37)|93|2(26)(37)|

116.

52|2(14)(25)|52|2(14)(25)|

117.

(−3)224÷(82)(−3)224÷(82)

118.

(−4)232÷(124)(−4)232÷(124)

In the following exercises, evaluate each expression.

119.

y+(−14)y+(−14) when
y=−33y=−33 y=30y=30

120.

x+(−21)x+(−21) when
x=−27x=−27 x=44x=44

121.

(x+y)2(x+y)2 when
x=−3,y=14x=−3,y=14

122.

(y+z)2(y+z)2 when
y=−3,z=15y=−3,z=15

123.

9a2b89a2b8 when
a=−6a=−6 and b=−3b=−3

124.

7m4n27m4n2 when
m=−4m=−4 and n=−9n=−9

125.

3x24xy+2y23x24xy+2y2 when
x=−2,y=−3x=−2,y=−3

126.

4x2xy+3y24x2xy+3y2 when
x=−3,y=−2x=−3,y=−2

Translate English Phrases to Algebraic Expressions

In the following exercises, translate to an algebraic expression and simplify if possible.

127.

the sum of 3 and −15,−15, increased by 7

128.

the sum of −8−8 and −9,−9, increased by 2323

129.


the difference of 1010 and −18−18
subtract 1111 from −25−25

130.


the difference of −5−5 and −30−30
subtract −6−6 from −13−13

131.

the quotient of −6−6 and the sum of aa and bb

132.

the product of −13−13 and the difference of cc and dd

Use Integers in Applications

In the following exercises, solve.

133.

Temperature On January 15, the high temperature in Anaheim, California, was 84°. That same day, the high temperature in Embarrass, Minnesota, was 12°.12°. What was the difference between the temperature in Anaheim and the temperature in Embarrass?

134.

Temperature On January 21, the high temperature in Palm Springs, California, was 89°,89°, and the high temperature in Whitefield, New Hampshire, was 31°.31°. What was the difference between the temperature in Palm Springs and the temperature in Whitefield?

135.

Football On the first down, the Chargers had the ball on their 25-yard line. They lost 6 yards on the first-down play, gained 10 yards on the second-down play, and lost 8 yards on the third-down play. What was the yard line at the end of the third-down play?

136.

Football On first down, the Steelers had the ball on their 30-yard line. They gained 9 yards on the first-down play, lost 14 yards on the second-down play, and lost 2 yards on the third-down play. What was the yard line at the end of the third-down play?

137.

Checking Account Mayra has $124 in her checking account. She writes a check for $152. What is the new balance in her checking account?

138.

Checking Account Reymonte has a balance of $49$49 in his checking account. He deposits $281 to the account. What is the new balance?

Writing Exercises

139.

Explain why the sum of −8−8 and 2 is negative, but the sum of 8 and −2−2 is positive.

140.

Give an example from your life experience of adding two negative numbers.

141.

In your own words, state the rules for multiplying and dividing integers.

142.

Why is 43=(−4)3?43=(−4)3?

Self Check

After completing the exercises, use this checklist to evaluate your mastery of the objectives of this section.

This table has 4 columns, 6 rows and a header row. The header row labels each column I can, confidently, with some help and no, I don’t get it. The first column has the following statements: simplify expressions with absolute value, add and subtract integers, multiply and divide integers, simplify and evaluate expressions with integers, translate English phrases to algebraic expressions, use integers in applications. The remaining columns are blank.

After reviewing this checklist, what will you do to become confident for all objectives?

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