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Table of contents
  1. Preface
  2. Connections Across Continents, 1500–1800
    1. 1 Understanding the Past
      1. Introduction
      2. 1.1 Developing a Global Perspective
      3. 1.2 Primary Sources
      4. 1.3 Causation and Interpretation in History
      5. Key Terms
      6. Section Summary
      7. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    2. 2 Exchange in East Asia and the Indian Ocean
      1. Introduction
      2. 2.1 India and International Connections
      3. 2.2 The Malacca Sultanate
      4. 2.3 Exchange in East Asia
      5. Key Terms
      6. Section Summary
      7. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    3. 3 Early Modern Africa and the Wider World
      1. Introduction
      2. 3.1 The Roots of African Trade
      3. 3.2 The Songhai Empire
      4. 3.3 The Swahili Coast
      5. 3.4 The Trans-Saharan Slave Trade
      6. Key Terms
      7. Section Summary
      8. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    4. 4 The Islamic World
      1. Introduction
      2. 4.1 A Connected Islamic World
      3. 4.2 The Ottoman Empire
      4. 4.3 The Safavid Empire
      5. Key Terms
      6. Section Summary
      7. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    5. 5 Foundations of the Atlantic World
      1. Introduction
      2. 5.1 The Protestant Reformation
      3. 5.2 Crossing the Atlantic
      4. 5.3 The Mercantilist Economy
      5. 5.4 The Atlantic Slave Trade
      6. Key Terms
      7. Section Summary
      8. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
  3. An Age of Revolution, 1750–1914
    1. 6 Colonization and Economic Expansion
      1. Introduction
      2. 6.1 European Colonization in the Americas
      3. 6.2 The Rise of a Global Economy
      4. 6.3 Capitalism and the First Industrial Revolution
      5. Key Terms
      6. Section Summary
      7. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    2. 7 Revolutions in Europe and North America
      1. Introduction
      2. 7.1 The Enlightenment
      3. 7.2 The Exchange of Ideas in the Public Sphere
      4. 7.3 Revolutions: America, France, and Haiti
      5. 7.4 Nationalism, Liberalism, Conservatism, and the Political Order
      6. Key Terms
      7. Section Summary
      8. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    3. 8 Revolutions in Latin America
      1. Introduction
      2. 8.1 Revolution for Whom?
      3. 8.2 Spanish North America
      4. 8.3 Spanish South America
      5. 8.4 Portuguese South America
      6. Key Terms
      7. Section Summary
      8. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    4. 9 Expansion in the Industrial Age
      1. Introduction
      2. 9.1 The Second Industrial Revolution
      3. 9.2 Motives and Means of Imperialism
      4. 9.3 Colonial Empires
      5. 9.4 Exploitation and Resistance
      6. Key Terms
      7. Section Summary
      8. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    5. 10 Life and Labor in the Industrial World
      1. Introduction
      2. 10.1 Inventions, Innovations, and Mechanization
      3. 10.2 Life in the Industrial City
      4. 10.3 Coerced and Semicoerced Labor
      5. 10.4 Communities in Diaspora
      6. 10.5 Regulation, Reform, and Revolutionary Ideologies
      7. Key Terms
      8. Section Summary
      9. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
  4. The Modern World, 1914–Present
    1. 11 The War to End All Wars
      1. Introduction
      2. 11.1 Alliances, Expansion, and Conflict
      3. 11.2 The Collapse of the Ottomans and the Coming of War
      4. 11.3 Total War
      5. 11.4 War on the Homefront
      6. 11.5 The War Ends
      7. Key Terms
      8. Section Summary
      9. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    2. 12 The Interwar Period
      1. Introduction
      2. 12.1 Recovering from World War I
      3. 12.2 The Formation of the Soviet Union
      4. 12.3 The Great Depression
      5. 12.4 Old Empires and New Colonies
      6. 12.5 Resistance, Civil Rights, and Democracy
      7. Key Terms
      8. Section Summary
      9. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    3. 13 The Causes and Consequences of World War II
      1. Introduction
      2. 13.1 An Unstable Peace
      3. 13.2 Theaters of War
      4. 13.3 Keeping the Home Fires Burning
      5. 13.4 Out of the Ashes
      6. Key Terms
      7. Section Summary
      8. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    4. 14 Cold War Conflicts
      1. Introduction
      2. 14.1 The Cold War Begins
      3. 14.2 The Spread of Communism
      4. 14.3 The Non-Aligned Movement
      5. 14.4 Global Tensions and Decolonization
      6. 14.5 A New World Order
      7. Key Terms
      8. Section Summary
      9. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
    5. 15 The Contemporary World and Ongoing Challenges
      1. Introduction
      2. 15.1 A Global Economy
      3. 15.2 Debates about the Environment
      4. 15.3 Science and Technology for Today’s World
      5. 15.4 Ongoing Problems and Solutions
      6. Key Terms
      7. Section Summary
      8. Assessments
        1. Review Questions
        2. Check Your Understanding Questions
        3. Application and Reflection Questions
  5. A | Glossary
  6. B | World History, Volume 2, from 1400: Maps and Timelines
  7. C | World Maps
  8. D | Recommended Resources for the Study of World History
  9. Index

Review Questions

1.
Which two nations engaged in a naval arms race?
  1. Great Britain and the United States
  2. France and Germany
  3. Germany and Great Britain
  4. Germany and the United States
2.
Where did Germany succeed in establishing most of its colonies?
  1. Africa and Latin America
  2. Africa and the Pacific
  3. Africa and Asia
  4. Asia and Latin America
3.
On which commander did Germany rely for its naval-building program?
  1. Otto von Bismarck
  2. Count von Bulöw
  3. Alfred von Tirpitz
  4. Napoléon III
4.
Why did Germany have fewer colonies than France and Britain in the early twentieth century?
  1. It had a moral hatred of colonies.
  2. It had industrialized and unified later than the other countries.
  3. It had a succession of monarchs, each lasting fewer than five years.
  4. It had little business or industry in the early twentieth century and no need for colonies.
5.
Germany was able to unify as an empire at the end of which event?
  1. the Franco-Prussian War
  2. the Russo-Japanese War
  3. the Austro-Prussian War
  4. the First Moroccan Crisis
6.
The Triple Entente consisted of which three countries?
  1. Germany, Italy, and Russia
  2. Belgium, Britain, and France
  3. Austria-Hungary, Germany, and Italy
  4. Britain, France, and Russia
7.
Upon what was the Schlieffen Plan predicated?
  1. Germany’s need to fight a two-front war
  2. German troops being in short supply for the first three months of the war
  3. an invasion of Germany by France at the outset of the war
  4. the speedy mobilization of Russian troops
8.
What helped cause the decline of the Ottoman Empire?
  1. financial trouble and increasing debt
  2. warfare on its eastern front
  3. nationalism spurring revolts and loss of territory
  4. factional politics within the Empire that caused turmoil among its top ministers
9.
What did Germany think would happen when it approached Belgium en route to France?
  1. that it would have to violently invade Belgium
  2. that Britain would immediately enter the war
  3. that Russia would immediately enter the war
  4. that Germany would be allowed to pass through Belgium easily
10.
Why did the United States initially stay neutral in the war?
  1. The United States did not want to fight either France or Germany, its long-standing allies.
  2. The United States had historically stayed out of European affairs.
  3. The United States had agreed to follow Canada’s lead and stay out of the war.
  4. The United States hoped the war would be quick and it could take over European colonies in the Caribbean when the war ended.
11.
Why did Germany sink the RMS Lusitania?
  1. because it had a large number of British passengers
  2. because it was transporting troops bound for Europe
  3. because it carried ammunition bound for the British army
  4. because it was heavily armed and sailing through the war zone to France
12.
What new type of military technology was introduced in World War I by the British?
  1. Big Bertha
  2. machine gun
  3. submarine
  4. tank
13.
Which battle was designed to annihilate as many French troops as possible?
  1. the Battle of the Somme
  2. the Battle of Verdun
  3. the Battle of Vimy Ridge
  4. the Battle of Tannenberg
14.
Troops from which two countries sustained heavy casualties at Gallipoli?
  1. France and Germany
  2. Germany and Italy
  3. Australia and New Zealand
  4. Austria-Hungary and Canada
15.
What group suffered genocide at the hands of the Ottoman Turks?
  1. the Kurds
  2. the Shiite Muslims
  3. the Armenians
  4. the Croatians
16.
Who was deported from the United States to Lithuania because of opposition to the draft?
  1. Käthe Kollwitz
  2. Wilfred Owen
  3. Emma Goldman
  4. Eugene V. Debs
17.
What was the “shell crisis” in Britain?
  1. the public’s outrage over the closure of munitions factories
  2. the political crisis over whether enough shells were being produced for the war effort
  3. the problem of artillery shells that exploded during loading, causing the deaths of thousands of troops on the western front
  4. the problems caused by Russia’s lack of military supplies for its armies
18.
What was extended to women in several countries in the wake of the war as a reward for their war work?
  1. the right to attend college
  2. the right to become homeowners
  3. the right to vote
  4. the right to serve in combat
19.
Who began the Easter Rising?
  1. Irish Unionists
  2. Irish Nationalists
  3. British troops
  4. Catholic clergy
20.
How did the tsarist government react to the events of Bloody Sunday?
  1. The tsar began holding regular meetings with the workers in St. Petersburg.
  2. The tsar began an oppressive crackdown and imposed martial law on the city.
  3. The tsar agreed to the creation of a legislature, the Duma, that included elected politicians.
  4. The tsar declared war against Germany for the shootings of Russian people.
21.
How did Lenin seize power in Russia?
  1. the 1905 Revolution
  2. the October Revolution
  3. the assassination of the leader of the provisional government
  4. a takeover of the Duma
22.
What territory did Germany gain from the Treaty of Brest-Litovsk?
  1. Poland and the Baltic states
  2. Turkey
  3. Sweden
  4. Austria and Hungary
23.
What disease was spreading around the world at the end of the war?
  1. smallpox
  2. influenza
  3. food poisoning
  4. bubonic plague
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