Skip to Content
OpenStax Logo
University Physics Volume 1

Additional Problems

University Physics Volume 1Additional Problems
Buy book
  1. Preface
  2. Unit 1. Mechanics
    1. 1 Units and Measurement
      1. Introduction
      2. 1.1 The Scope and Scale of Physics
      3. 1.2 Units and Standards
      4. 1.3 Unit Conversion
      5. 1.4 Dimensional Analysis
      6. 1.5 Estimates and Fermi Calculations
      7. 1.6 Significant Figures
      8. 1.7 Solving Problems in Physics
      9. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    2. 2 Vectors
      1. Introduction
      2. 2.1 Scalars and Vectors
      3. 2.2 Coordinate Systems and Components of a Vector
      4. 2.3 Algebra of Vectors
      5. 2.4 Products of Vectors
      6. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    3. 3 Motion Along a Straight Line
      1. Introduction
      2. 3.1 Position, Displacement, and Average Velocity
      3. 3.2 Instantaneous Velocity and Speed
      4. 3.3 Average and Instantaneous Acceleration
      5. 3.4 Motion with Constant Acceleration
      6. 3.5 Free Fall
      7. 3.6 Finding Velocity and Displacement from Acceleration
      8. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    4. 4 Motion in Two and Three Dimensions
      1. Introduction
      2. 4.1 Displacement and Velocity Vectors
      3. 4.2 Acceleration Vector
      4. 4.3 Projectile Motion
      5. 4.4 Uniform Circular Motion
      6. 4.5 Relative Motion in One and Two Dimensions
      7. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    5. 5 Newton's Laws of Motion
      1. Introduction
      2. 5.1 Forces
      3. 5.2 Newton's First Law
      4. 5.3 Newton's Second Law
      5. 5.4 Mass and Weight
      6. 5.5 Newton’s Third Law
      7. 5.6 Common Forces
      8. 5.7 Drawing Free-Body Diagrams
      9. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    6. 6 Applications of Newton's Laws
      1. Introduction
      2. 6.1 Solving Problems with Newton’s Laws
      3. 6.2 Friction
      4. 6.3 Centripetal Force
      5. 6.4 Drag Force and Terminal Speed
      6. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    7. 7 Work and Kinetic Energy
      1. Introduction
      2. 7.1 Work
      3. 7.2 Kinetic Energy
      4. 7.3 Work-Energy Theorem
      5. 7.4 Power
      6. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    8. 8 Potential Energy and Conservation of Energy
      1. Introduction
      2. 8.1 Potential Energy of a System
      3. 8.2 Conservative and Non-Conservative Forces
      4. 8.3 Conservation of Energy
      5. 8.4 Potential Energy Diagrams and Stability
      6. 8.5 Sources of Energy
      7. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
    9. 9 Linear Momentum and Collisions
      1. Introduction
      2. 9.1 Linear Momentum
      3. 9.2 Impulse and Collisions
      4. 9.3 Conservation of Linear Momentum
      5. 9.4 Types of Collisions
      6. 9.5 Collisions in Multiple Dimensions
      7. 9.6 Center of Mass
      8. 9.7 Rocket Propulsion
      9. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    10. 10 Fixed-Axis Rotation
      1. Introduction
      2. 10.1 Rotational Variables
      3. 10.2 Rotation with Constant Angular Acceleration
      4. 10.3 Relating Angular and Translational Quantities
      5. 10.4 Moment of Inertia and Rotational Kinetic Energy
      6. 10.5 Calculating Moments of Inertia
      7. 10.6 Torque
      8. 10.7 Newton’s Second Law for Rotation
      9. 10.8 Work and Power for Rotational Motion
      10. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    11. 11 Angular Momentum
      1. Introduction
      2. 11.1 Rolling Motion
      3. 11.2 Angular Momentum
      4. 11.3 Conservation of Angular Momentum
      5. 11.4 Precession of a Gyroscope
      6. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    12. 12 Static Equilibrium and Elasticity
      1. Introduction
      2. 12.1 Conditions for Static Equilibrium
      3. 12.2 Examples of Static Equilibrium
      4. 12.3 Stress, Strain, and Elastic Modulus
      5. 12.4 Elasticity and Plasticity
      6. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    13. 13 Gravitation
      1. Introduction
      2. 13.1 Newton's Law of Universal Gravitation
      3. 13.2 Gravitation Near Earth's Surface
      4. 13.3 Gravitational Potential Energy and Total Energy
      5. 13.4 Satellite Orbits and Energy
      6. 13.5 Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion
      7. 13.6 Tidal Forces
      8. 13.7 Einstein's Theory of Gravity
      9. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    14. 14 Fluid Mechanics
      1. Introduction
      2. 14.1 Fluids, Density, and Pressure
      3. 14.2 Measuring Pressure
      4. 14.3 Pascal's Principle and Hydraulics
      5. 14.4 Archimedes’ Principle and Buoyancy
      6. 14.5 Fluid Dynamics
      7. 14.6 Bernoulli’s Equation
      8. 14.7 Viscosity and Turbulence
      9. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
  3. Unit 2. Waves and Acoustics
    1. 15 Oscillations
      1. Introduction
      2. 15.1 Simple Harmonic Motion
      3. 15.2 Energy in Simple Harmonic Motion
      4. 15.3 Comparing Simple Harmonic Motion and Circular Motion
      5. 15.4 Pendulums
      6. 15.5 Damped Oscillations
      7. 15.6 Forced Oscillations
      8. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    2. 16 Waves
      1. Introduction
      2. 16.1 Traveling Waves
      3. 16.2 Mathematics of Waves
      4. 16.3 Wave Speed on a Stretched String
      5. 16.4 Energy and Power of a Wave
      6. 16.5 Interference of Waves
      7. 16.6 Standing Waves and Resonance
      8. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
    3. 17 Sound
      1. Introduction
      2. 17.1 Sound Waves
      3. 17.2 Speed of Sound
      4. 17.3 Sound Intensity
      5. 17.4 Normal Modes of a Standing Sound Wave
      6. 17.5 Sources of Musical Sound
      7. 17.6 Beats
      8. 17.7 The Doppler Effect
      9. 17.8 Shock Waves
      10. Chapter Review
        1. Key Terms
        2. Key Equations
        3. Summary
        4. Conceptual Questions
        5. Problems
        6. Additional Problems
        7. Challenge Problems
  4. A | Units
  5. B | Conversion Factors
  6. C | Fundamental Constants
  7. D | Astronomical Data
  8. E | Mathematical Formulas
  9. F | Chemistry
  10. G | The Greek Alphabet
  11. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
    12. Chapter 12
    13. Chapter 13
    14. Chapter 14
    15. Chapter 15
    16. Chapter 16
    17. Chapter 17
  12. Index

Additional Problems

72.

Two small forces, F1=−2.40i^6.10j^F1=−2.40i^6.10j^ N and F2=8.50i^9.70j^F2=8.50i^9.70j^ N, are exerted on a rogue asteroid by a pair of space tractors. (a) Find the net force. (b) What are the magnitude and direction of the net force? (c) If the mass of the asteroid is 125 kg, what acceleration does it experience (in vector form)? (d) What are the magnitude and direction of the acceleration?

73.

Two forces of 25 and 45 N act on an object. Their directions differ by 70°70°. The resulting acceleration has magnitude of 10.0m/s2.10.0m/s2. What is the mass of the body?

74.

A force of 1600 N acts parallel to a ramp to push a 300-kg piano into a moving van. The ramp is inclined at 20°20°. (a) What is the acceleration of the piano up the ramp? (b) What is the velocity of the piano when it reaches the top if the ramp is 4.0 m long and the piano starts from rest?

75.

Draw a free-body diagram of a diver who has entered the water, moved downward, and is acted on by an upward force due to the water which balances the weight (that is, the diver is suspended).

76.

For a swimmer who has just jumped off a diving board, assume air resistance is negligible. The swimmer has a mass of 80.0 kg and jumps off a board 10.0 m above the water. Three seconds after entering the water, her downward motion is stopped. What average upward force did the water exert on her?

77.

(a) Find an equation to determine the magnitude of the net force required to stop a car of mass m, given that the initial speed of the car is v0v0 and the stopping distance is x. (b) Find the magnitude of the net force if the mass of the car is 1050 kg, the initial speed is 40.0 km/h, and the stopping distance is 25.0 m.

78.

A sailboat has a mass of 1.50×1031.50×103 kg and is acted on by a force of 2.00×1032.00×103 N toward the east, while the wind acts behind the sails with a force of 3.00×1033.00×103 N in a direction 45°45° north of east. Find the magnitude and direction of the resulting acceleration.

79.

Find the acceleration of the body of mass 10.0 kg shown below.

Three arrow radiate outwards from a circle labeled m. F1, equal to 10 N, points vertically down. F2, equal to 20 N, points up and right, making an angle of  minus 37 degrees with the positive y axis. F3, equal to 10 N, points up and left, making an angle of 37 degrees with the positive y axis.
80.

A body of mass 2.0 kg is moving along the x-axis with a speed of 3.0 m/s at the instant represented below. (a) What is the acceleration of the body? (b) What is the body’s velocity 10.0 s later? (c) What is its displacement after 10.0 s?

Three arrow radiate outwards from a circle labeled m. F1, equal to 50 N, points up and right, making an angle of 37 degrees with the x axis. F2, equal to 30 N, points left and down, making an angle of minus 30 degrees with the negative y axis. F3, equal to 80 N, points left.
81.

Force FBFB has twice the magnitude of force FA.FA. Find the direction in which the particle accelerates in this figure.

Two arrows radiate outwards from a circle labeled m. F subscript A points right. F subscript B points down and left, making an angle of 45 degrees with the horizontal.
82.

Shown below is a body of mass 1.0 kg under the influence of the forces FAFA, FBFB, and mgmg. If the body accelerates to the left at 20m/s220m/s2, what are FAFA and FBFB?

Three arrows radiate outwards from a point labeled m. F subscript A points left and down, making an angle of 60 degrees with the negative x axis. F subscript B points left and up, making an angle of minus 30 degrees with the negative x axis. Vector mg points vertically down.
83.

A force acts on a car of mass m so that the speed v of the car increases with position x as v=kx2v=kx2, where k is constant and all quantities are in SI units. Find the force acting on the car as a function of position.

84.

A 7.0-N force parallel to an incline is applied to a 1.0-kg crate. The ramp is tilted at 20°20° and is frictionless. (a) What is the acceleration of the crate? (b) If all other conditions are the same but the ramp has a friction force of 1.9 N, what is the acceleration?

85.

Two boxes, A and B, are at rest. Box A is on level ground, while box B rests on an inclined plane tilted at angle θθ with the horizontal. (a) Write expressions for the normal force acting on each block. (b) Compare the two forces; that is, tell which one is larger or whether they are equal in magnitude. (c) If the angle of incline is 10°10°, which force is greater?

86.

A mass of 250.0 g is suspended from a spring hanging vertically. The spring stretches 6.00 cm. How much will the spring stretch if the suspended mass is 530.0 g?

87.

As shown below, two identical springs, each with the spring constant 20 N/m, support a 15.0-N weight. (a) What is the tension in spring A? (b) What is the amount of stretch of spring A from the rest position?

Figure shows two identical springs hanging side by side. Their lower ends are brought together and support a weight. Each spring makes an angle of 30 degrees with the vertical.
88.

Shown below is a 30.0-kg block resting on a frictionless ramp inclined at 60°60° to the horizontal. The block is held by a spring that is stretched 5.0 cm. What is the force constant of the spring?

Figure shows a surface sloping down and left, making an angle of 60 degrees with the horizontal. An object of 30 kg hangs from a spring and rests on the slope.
89.

In building a house, carpenters use nails from a large box. The box is suspended from a spring twice during the day to measure the usage of nails. At the beginning of the day, the spring stretches 50 cm. At the end of the day, the spring stretches 30 cm. What fraction or percentage of the nails have been used?

90.

A force is applied to a block to move it up a 30°30° incline. The incline is frictionless. If F=65.0NF=65.0N and M=5.00kgM=5.00kg, what is the magnitude of the acceleration of the block?

Figure shows a surface sloping down and right, making an angle of 30 degrees with the horizontal. A box labeled M rests on it. An arrow labeled F points horizontally left towards the box. The angle formed by the arrow and the slope is 30 degrees.
91.

Two forces are applied to a 5.0-kg object, and it accelerates at a rate of 2.0m/s22.0m/s2 in the positive y-direction. If one of the forces acts in the positive x-direction with magnitude 12.0 N, find the magnitude of the other force.

92.

The block on the right shown below has more mass than the block on the left (m2>m1m2>m1). Draw free-body diagrams for each block.

A pulley is attached to the ceiling. A rope goes over it. A block of mass m1 is attached to the left end of the rope and another block labeled m2 is attached to the right end of the rope. M2 hangs lower than m1.
Citation/Attribution

Want to cite, share, or modify this book? This book is Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 and you must attribute OpenStax.

Attribution information
  • If you are redistributing all or part of this book in a print format, then you must include on every physical page the following attribution:
    Access for free at https://openstax.org/books/university-physics-volume-1/pages/1-introduction
  • If you are redistributing all or part of this book in a digital format, then you must include on every digital page view the following attribution:
    Access for free at https://openstax.org/books/university-physics-volume-1/pages/1-introduction
Citation information

© Sep 19, 2016 OpenStax. Textbook content produced by OpenStax is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 license. The OpenStax name, OpenStax logo, OpenStax book covers, OpenStax CNX name, and OpenStax CNX logo are not subject to the Creative Commons license and may not be reproduced without the prior and express written consent of Rice University.