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  1. Preface
  2. 1 Accounting as a Tool for Managers
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 1.1 Define Managerial Accounting and Identify the Three Primary Responsibilities of Management
    3. 1.2 Distinguish between Financial and Managerial Accounting
    4. 1.3 Explain the Primary Roles and Skills Required of Managerial Accountants
    5. 1.4 Describe the Role of the Institute of Management Accountants and the Use of Ethical Standards
    6. 1.5 Describe Trends in Today’s Business Environment and Analyze Their Impact on Accounting
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Thought Provokers
  3. 2 Building Blocks of Managerial Accounting
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 2.1 Distinguish between Merchandising, Manufacturing, and Service Organizations
    3. 2.2 Identify and Apply Basic Cost Behavior Patterns
    4. 2.3 Estimate a Variable and Fixed Cost Equation and Predict Future Costs
    5. Key Terms
    6. Summary
    7. Multiple Choice
    8. Questions
    9. Exercise Set A
    10. Exercise Set B
    11. Problem Set A
    12. Problem Set B
    13. Thought Provokers
  4. 3 Cost-Volume-Profit Analysis
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 3.1 Explain Contribution Margin and Calculate Contribution Margin per Unit, Contribution Margin Ratio, and Total Contribution Margin
    3. 3.2 Calculate a Break-Even Point in Units and Dollars
    4. 3.3 Perform Break-Even Sensitivity Analysis for a Single Product Under Changing Business Situations
    5. 3.4 Perform Break-Even Sensitivity Analysis for a Multi-Product Environment Under Changing Business Situations
    6. 3.5 Calculate and Interpret a Company’s Margin of Safety and Operating Leverage
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  5. 4 Job Order Costing
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 4.1 Distinguish between Job Order Costing and Process Costing
    3. 4.2 Describe and Identify the Three Major Components of Product Costs under Job Order Costing
    4. 4.3 Use the Job Order Costing Method to Trace the Flow of Product Costs through the Inventory Accounts
    5. 4.4 Compute a Predetermined Overhead Rate and Apply Overhead to Production
    6. 4.5 Compute the Cost of a Job Using Job Order Costing
    7. 4.6 Determine and Dispose of Underapplied or Overapplied Overhead
    8. 4.7 Prepare Journal Entries for a Job Order Cost System
    9. 4.8 Explain How a Job Order Cost System Applies to a Nonmanufacturing Environment
    10. Key Terms
    11. Summary
    12. Multiple Choice
    13. Questions
    14. Exercise Set A
    15. Exercise Set B
    16. Problem Set A
    17. Problem Set B
    18. Thought Provokers
  6. 5 Process Costing
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 5.1 Compare and Contrast Job Order Costing and Process Costing
    3. 5.2 Explain and Identify Conversion Costs
    4. 5.3 Explain and Compute Equivalent Units and Total Cost of Production in an Initial Processing Stage
    5. 5.4 Explain and Compute Equivalent Units and Total Cost of Production in a Subsequent Processing Stage
    6. 5.5 Prepare Journal Entries for a Process Costing System
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  7. 6 Activity-Based, Variable, and Absorption Costing
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 6.1 Calculate Predetermined Overhead and Total Cost under the Traditional Allocation Method
    3. 6.2 Describe and Identify Cost Drivers
    4. 6.3 Calculate Activity-Based Product Costs
    5. 6.4 Compare and Contrast Traditional and Activity-Based Costing Systems
    6. 6.5 Compare and Contrast Variable and Absorption Costing
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  8. 7 Budgeting
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 7.1 Describe How and Why Managers Use Budgets
    3. 7.2 Prepare Operating Budgets
    4. 7.3 Prepare Financial Budgets
    5. 7.4 Prepare Flexible Budgets
    6. 7.5 Explain How Budgets Are Used to Evaluate Goals
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  9. 8 Standard Costs and Variances
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 8.1 Explain How and Why a Standard Cost Is Developed
    3. 8.2 Compute and Evaluate Materials Variances
    4. 8.3 Compute and Evaluate Labor Variances
    5. 8.4 Compute and Evaluate Overhead Variances
    6. 8.5 Describe How Companies Use Variance Analysis
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  10. 9 Responsibility Accounting and Decentralization
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 9.1 Differentiate between Centralized and Decentralized Management
    3. 9.2 Describe How Decision-Making Differs between Centralized and Decentralized Environments
    4. 9.3 Describe the Types of Responsibility Centers
    5. 9.4 Describe the Effects of Various Decisions on Performance Evaluation of Responsibility Centers
    6. Key Terms
    7. Summary
    8. Multiple Choice
    9. Questions
    10. Exercise Set A
    11. Exercise Set B
    12. Problem Set A
    13. Problem Set B
    14. Thought Provokers
  11. 10 Short-Term Decision Making
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 10.1 Identify Relevant Information for Decision-Making
    3. 10.2 Evaluate and Determine Whether to Accept or Reject a Special Order
    4. 10.3 Evaluate and Determine Whether to Make or Buy a Component
    5. 10.4 Evaluate and Determine Whether to Keep or Discontinue a Segment or Product
    6. 10.5 Evaluate and Determine Whether to Sell or Process Further
    7. 10.6 Evaluate and Determine How to Make Decisions When Resources Are Constrained
    8. Key Terms
    9. Summary
    10. Multiple Choice
    11. Questions
    12. Exercise Set A
    13. Exercise Set B
    14. Problem Set A
    15. Problem Set B
    16. Thought Provokers
  12. 11 Capital Budgeting Decisions
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 11.1 Describe Capital Investment Decisions and How They Are Applied
    3. 11.2 Evaluate the Payback and Accounting Rate of Return in Capital Investment Decisions
    4. 11.3 Explain the Time Value of Money and Calculate Present and Future Values of Lump Sums and Annuities
    5. 11.4 Use Discounted Cash Flow Models to Make Capital Investment Decisions
    6. 11.5 Compare and Contrast Non-Time Value-Based Methods and Time Value-Based Methods in Capital Investment Decisions
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  13. 12 Balanced Scorecard and Other Performance Measures
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 12.1 Explain the Importance of Performance Measurement
    3. 12.2 Identify the Characteristics of an Effective Performance Measure
    4. 12.3 Evaluate an Operating Segment or a Project Using Return on Investment, Residual Income, and Economic Value Added
    5. 12.4 Describe the Balanced Scorecard and Explain How It Is Used
    6. Key Terms
    7. Summary
    8. Multiple Choice
    9. Questions
    10. Exercise Set A
    11. Exercise Set B
    12. Problem Set A
    13. Problem Set B
    14. Thought Provokers
  14. 13 Sustainability Reporting
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 13.1 Describe Sustainability and the Way It Creates Business Value
    3. 13.2 Identify User Needs for Information
    4. 13.3 Discuss Examples of Major Sustainability Initiatives
    5. 13.4 Future Issues in Sustainability
    6. Key Terms
    7. Summary
    8. Multiple Choice
    9. Questions
    10. Thought Provokers
  15. Financial Statement Analysis
  16. Time Value of Money
  17. Suggested Resources
  18. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
    12. Chapter 12
    13. Chapter 13
  19. Index
EA1.

LO 10.1Garrison Boutique, a small novelty store, just spent $4,000 on a new software program that will help in organizing its inventory. Due to the steep learning curve required to use the new software, Garrison must decide between hiring two part-time college students or one full-time employee. Each college student would work 20 hours per week, and would earn $15 per hour. The full-time employee would work 40 hours per week and would earn $15 per hour plus the equivalent of $2 per hour in benefits. Employees are given two polo shirts to wear as their uniform. The polo-shirts cost Garrison $10 each. What are the relevant costs, relevant revenues, sunk costs, and opportunity costs for Garrison?

EA2.

LO 10.1Derek Dingler conducts corporate training seminars on managerial accounting techniques all around the country. An upcoming training seminar is to be held in Philadelphia. Just prior to that engagement, Derek will be in New York City. He plans to stay in Philadelphia the night of the seminar, as the next morning he plans to meet with clients about future training seminar possibilities. One travel option is to fly from New York to Philadelphia on the first flight on Friday morning, which will get him to Philadelphia two hours before the start of his seminar. The cost of that flight is $287. Uber fees for his time in Philadelphia will cost $68. His meal per diem is $40 for each full day and $25 for each half day. The hotel cost is $225 per night. His second option is to rent a car and drive the two hours to Philadelphia from New York City the afternoon before the seminar. The cost of the rental car including gas is $57 per day and the car will be needed for two full days. At the end of the meetings he will return to New York City. What are the relevant costs, relevant revenues, sunk costs, and opportunity costs that Derek Dingler has to consider in making the decision whether to fly or drive from New York City to Philadelphia?

EA3.

LO 10.1Bridget Youhzi works for a large firm. Her alma mater has asked her to make a presentation to the upcoming accounting honor society’s annual scholarship dinner. Her firm supports the presentation because it hopes to recruit more excellent employees like Bridget. The university is 196 miles from her office. In order to get to the dinner by 5:00 p.m., she will need to leave work at 1:00 p.m. She can drive her personal car and be reimbursed $0.50 per mile. The dinner ends at 9:00 p.m. Company policy allows her to spend the night if the return trip is four hours or more. There is a student-run inn and conference center across the street from campus that charges $101 per night.

Instead of driving, she could catch a 3:00 p.m. flight that has a round-trip fare of $300. Flying would require her to rent a car for $39 per day and pay an airport parking fee of $25 for the day. The company pays a per diem of $35 for incidentals if the employee spends at least six hours out of town. (The per diem would be for one 24-hour period for either flying or driving.) As a manager, Bridget is responsible for recruiting within a budget and wants to determine which is more economical.

Use the information provided to answer these questions.

  1. What is the total amount of expenses Bridget would include on her expense report if she drives?
  2. What is the total amount of expenses she would include on her expense report if she flies?
  3. What is the relevant cost of driving?
  4. What is the relevant cost of flying?
  5. What is the differential cost of flying over driving?
  6. What other factors should Bridget consider in her decision between driving and flying?
EA4.

LO 10.2Zena Technology sells arc computer printers for $55 per unit. Unit product costs are:

Direct materials $14, Direct labor $20, Manufacturing overhead $3 equals Total $37.

A special order to purchase 15,000 arc printers has recently been received from another company and Zena has idle capacity to fill the order. Zena will incur an additional $2 per printer for additional labor costs due to a slight modification the buyer wants made to the original product. One-third of the manufacturing overhead costs is fixed and will be incurred no matter how many units are produced. When negotiating the price, what is the minimum selling price that Zena should accept for this special order?

EA5.

LO 10.2Shelby Industries has a capacity to produce 45,000 oak shelves per year and is currently selling 40,000 shelves for $32 each. Martin Hardwoods has approached Shelby about buying 1,200 shelves for a new project and is willing to pay $26 each. The shelves can be packaged in bulk; this saves Shelby $1.50 per shelf compared to the normal packaging cost. Shelves have a unit variable cost of $27 with fixed costs of $350,000. Because the shelves don’t require packaging, the unit variable costs for the special order will drop from $27 per shelf to $25.50 per shelf. Shelby has enough idle capacity to accept the contract. What is the minimum price per shelf that Shelby should accept for this special order?

EA6.

LO 10.3Reuben’s Deli currently makes rolls for deli sandwiches it produces. It uses 30,000 rolls annually in the production of deli sandwiches. The costs to make the rolls are:

Cost per roll: Materials $0.24, Labor, $0.40, Variable overhead $0.16, Fixed overhead $0.20.

A potential supplier has offered to sell Reuben the rolls for $0.90 each. If the rolls are purchased, 30% of the fixed overhead could be avoided. If Reuben accepts the offer, what will the effect on profit be?

EA7.

LO 10.3Almond Treats manufactures various types of cereals that feature almonds. Acme Cereal Company has approached Almond Treats with a proposal to sell the company its top selling cereal at a price of $22,000 for 20,000 pounds. The costs shown are associated with production of 20,000 pounds of almond cereal:

Direct materials $13,000, Direct labor $5,000, Manufacturing overhead $7,000, Total cost $25,000.

The manufacturing overhead consists of $2,000 of variable costs with the balance being allocated to fixed costs. Should Almond Treats make or buy the almond cereal?

EA8.

LO 10.4Party Supply is trying to decide whether or not to continue its costume segment. The information shown is available for Party Supply’s business segments. Assume that neither the Direct fixed costs nor the Allocated common fixed costs may be eliminated, but will be allocated to the two remaining segments.

Costumes, Party Supplies, and Floral Decorations, respectively: Sales $160,000, $110,000, $120,000 less Variable costs $84,000, $50,000, $120,000 equals Contribution margin $76,000, $60,000, $90,000 less Direct fixed costs $50,000, $20,000, $25,000 and Allocated common fixed costs $30,000, $25,000, $30,000 equals Net income $(4,000), $15,000, $35,000.

If costumes are dropped, what change will occur to profit?

EA9.

LO 10.5Underground Food Store has 4,000 pounds of raw beef nearing its expiration date. Each pound has a cost of $4.50. The beef could be sold “as is” for $3.00 per pound to the dog food processing plant, or roasted and sold in the deli. The cost of roasting the beef will be $2.80 per pound, and each pound could be sold for $6.50. What should be done with the beef, and why?

EA10.

LO 10.5Ralston Dairy gathered this data about the two products that it produces:

Product, Current Sales Value, Estimated Added Processing Costs, and Sales Value if Processed Further, respectively: Frozen yogurt $8,000, $2,000, $11,000. Ice cream $12,000, $7,000, $18,000.

Which of the products should be processed further?

EA11.

LO 10.6Rough Stuff makes 2 products: khaki shorts and khaki pants for men. Each product passes through the cutting machine area, which is the chief constraint during production. Khaki shorts take 15 minutes on the cutting machine and have a contribution margin per pair of shorts of $16. Khaki pants take 24 minutes on the cutting machine and have a contribution margin per pair of pants of $32. If it is assumed that Rough Stuff has 4,800 hours available on the cutting machine to service a minimum demand for each product of 3,000 units, how much will profits increase if 100 more hours of machine time can be obtained?

EA12.

LO 10.6Rough Stuff makes 2 products: khaki shorts and khaki pants for men. Each product passes through the cutting machine area, which is the chief constraint during production. Khaki shorts take 15 minutes on the cutting machine and have a contribution margin per pair of shorts of $16. Khaki pants take 24 minutes on the cutting machine and have a contribution margin per pair of pants of $32. If it is assumed that Rough Stuff has 4,800 hours available on the cutting machine to service a minimum demand for each product of 3,000 units, how many of each product should be made?

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