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Prealgebra 2e

1.4 Multiply Whole Numbers

Prealgebra 2e1.4 Multiply Whole Numbers
  1. Preface
  2. 1 Whole Numbers
    1. Introduction
    2. 1.1 Introduction to Whole Numbers
    3. 1.2 Add Whole Numbers
    4. 1.3 Subtract Whole Numbers
    5. 1.4 Multiply Whole Numbers
    6. 1.5 Divide Whole Numbers
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  3. 2 The Language of Algebra
    1. Introduction to the Language of Algebra
    2. 2.1 Use the Language of Algebra
    3. 2.2 Evaluate, Simplify, and Translate Expressions
    4. 2.3 Solving Equations Using the Subtraction and Addition Properties of Equality
    5. 2.4 Find Multiples and Factors
    6. 2.5 Prime Factorization and the Least Common Multiple
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  4. 3 Integers
    1. Introduction to Integers
    2. 3.1 Introduction to Integers
    3. 3.2 Add Integers
    4. 3.3 Subtract Integers
    5. 3.4 Multiply and Divide Integers
    6. 3.5 Solve Equations Using Integers; The Division Property of Equality
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  5. 4 Fractions
    1. Introduction to Fractions
    2. 4.1 Visualize Fractions
    3. 4.2 Multiply and Divide Fractions
    4. 4.3 Multiply and Divide Mixed Numbers and Complex Fractions
    5. 4.4 Add and Subtract Fractions with Common Denominators
    6. 4.5 Add and Subtract Fractions with Different Denominators
    7. 4.6 Add and Subtract Mixed Numbers
    8. 4.7 Solve Equations with Fractions
    9. Key Terms
    10. Key Concepts
    11. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  6. 5 Decimals
    1. Introduction to Decimals
    2. 5.1 Decimals
    3. 5.2 Decimal Operations
    4. 5.3 Decimals and Fractions
    5. 5.4 Solve Equations with Decimals
    6. 5.5 Averages and Probability
    7. 5.6 Ratios and Rate
    8. 5.7 Simplify and Use Square Roots
    9. Key Terms
    10. Key Concepts
    11. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  7. 6 Percents
    1. Introduction to Percents
    2. 6.1 Understand Percent
    3. 6.2 Solve General Applications of Percent
    4. 6.3 Solve Sales Tax, Commission, and Discount Applications
    5. 6.4 Solve Simple Interest Applications
    6. 6.5 Solve Proportions and their Applications
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  8. 7 The Properties of Real Numbers
    1. Introduction to the Properties of Real Numbers
    2. 7.1 Rational and Irrational Numbers
    3. 7.2 Commutative and Associative Properties
    4. 7.3 Distributive Property
    5. 7.4 Properties of Identity, Inverses, and Zero
    6. 7.5 Systems of Measurement
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  9. 8 Solving Linear Equations
    1. Introduction to Solving Linear Equations
    2. 8.1 Solve Equations Using the Subtraction and Addition Properties of Equality
    3. 8.2 Solve Equations Using the Division and Multiplication Properties of Equality
    4. 8.3 Solve Equations with Variables and Constants on Both Sides
    5. 8.4 Solve Equations with Fraction or Decimal Coefficients
    6. Key Terms
    7. Key Concepts
    8. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  10. 9 Math Models and Geometry
    1. Introduction
    2. 9.1 Use a Problem Solving Strategy
    3. 9.2 Solve Money Applications
    4. 9.3 Use Properties of Angles, Triangles, and the Pythagorean Theorem
    5. 9.4 Use Properties of Rectangles, Triangles, and Trapezoids
    6. 9.5 Solve Geometry Applications: Circles and Irregular Figures
    7. 9.6 Solve Geometry Applications: Volume and Surface Area
    8. 9.7 Solve a Formula for a Specific Variable
    9. Key Terms
    10. Key Concepts
    11. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  11. 10 Polynomials
    1. Introduction to Polynomials
    2. 10.1 Add and Subtract Polynomials
    3. 10.2 Use Multiplication Properties of Exponents
    4. 10.3 Multiply Polynomials
    5. 10.4 Divide Monomials
    6. 10.5 Integer Exponents and Scientific Notation
    7. 10.6 Introduction to Factoring Polynomials
    8. Key Terms
    9. Key Concepts
    10. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  12. 11 Graphs
    1. Graphs
    2. 11.1 Use the Rectangular Coordinate System
    3. 11.2 Graphing Linear Equations
    4. 11.3 Graphing with Intercepts
    5. 11.4 Understand Slope of a Line
    6. Key Terms
    7. Key Concepts
    8. Exercises
      1. Review Exercises
      2. Practice Test
  13. A | Cumulative Review
  14. B | Powers and Roots Tables
  15. C | Geometric Formulas
  16. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
  17. Index

Learning Objectives

By the end of this section, you will be able to:
  • Use multiplication notation
  • Model multiplication of whole numbers
  • Multiply whole numbers
  • Translate word phrases to math notation
  • Multiply whole numbers in applications
Be Prepared 1.5

Before you get started, take this readiness quiz.

Add: 1,683+479.1,683+479.
If you missed this problem, review Example 1.21.

Be Prepared 1.6

Subtract: 605321.605321.
If you missed this problem, review Example 1.33.

Use Multiplication Notation

Suppose you were asked to count all these pennies shown in Figure 1.11.

An image of 3 horizontal rows of pennies, each row containing 8 pennies.
Figure 1.11

Would you count the pennies individually? Or would you count the number of pennies in each row and add that number 33 times.

8+8+88+8+8

Multiplication is a way to represent repeated addition. So instead of adding 88 three times, we could write a multiplication expression.

3×83×8

We call each number being multiplied a factor and the result the product. We read 3×83×8 as three times eight, and the result as the product of three and eight.

There are several symbols that represent multiplication. These include the symbol ×× as well as the dot, ··, and parentheses ().().

Operation Symbols for Multiplication

To describe multiplication, we can use symbols and words.

Operation Notation Expression Read as Result
MultiplicationMultiplication ××
··
()()
3×83×8
3·83·8
3(8)3(8)
three times eightthree times eight the product of 3 and 8the product of 3 and 8

Example 1.39

Translate from math notation to words:

  1. 7×67×6
  2. 12·1412·14
  3. 6(13)6(13)
Try It 1.77

Translate from math notation to words:

  1. 8×78×7
  2. 18·1118·11
Try It 1.78

Translate from math notation to words:

  1. (13)(7)(13)(7)
  2. 5(16)5(16)

Model Multiplication of Whole Numbers

There are many ways to model multiplication. Unlike in the previous sections where we used base-10base-10 blocks, here we will use counters to help us understand the meaning of multiplication. A counter is any object that can be used for counting. We will use round blue counters.

Example 1.40

Model: 3×8.3×8.

Try It 1.79

Model each multiplication: 4×6.4×6.

Try It 1.80

Model each multiplication: 5×7.5×7.

Multiply Whole Numbers

In order to multiply without using models, you need to know all the one digit multiplication facts. Make sure you know them fluently before proceeding in this section.

Table 1.4 shows the multiplication facts. Each box shows the product of the number down the left column and the number across the top row. If you are unsure about a product, model it. It is important that you memorize any number facts you do not already know so you will be ready to multiply larger numbers.

× 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
2 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18
3 0 3 6 9 12 15 18 21 24 27
4 0 4 8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36
5 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45
6 0 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54
7 0 7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63
8 0 8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72
9 0 9 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81
Table 1.4

What happens when you multiply a number by zero? You can see that the product of any number and zero is zero. This is called the Multiplication Property of Zero.

Multiplication Property of Zero

The product of any number and 00 is 0.0.

a·0=00·a=0a·0=00·a=0

Example 1.41

Multiply:

  1. 0·110·11
  2. (42)0(42)0
Try It 1.81

Find each product:

  1. 0·190·19
  2. (39)0(39)0
Try It 1.82

Find each product:

  1. 0·240·24
  2. (57)0(57)0

What happens when you multiply a number by one? Multiplying a number by one does not change its value. We call this fact the Identity Property of Multiplication, and 11 is called the multiplicative identity.

Identity Property of Multiplication

The product of any number and 11 is the number.

1·a=aa·1=a1·a=aa·1=a

Example 1.42

Multiply:

  1. (11)1(11)1
  2. 1·421·42
Try It 1.83

Find each product:

  1. (19)1(19)1
  2. 1·391·39
Try It 1.84

Find each product:

  1. (24)(1)(24)(1)
  2. 1×571×57

Earlier in this chapter, we learned that the Commutative Property of Addition states that changing the order of addition does not change the sum. We saw that 8+9=178+9=17 is the same as 9+8=17.9+8=17.

Is this also true for multiplication? Let’s look at a few pairs of factors.

4·7=287·4=284·7=287·4=28
9·7=637·9=639·7=637·9=63
8·9=729·8=728·9=729·8=72

When the order of the factors is reversed, the product does not change. This is called the Commutative Property of Multiplication.

Commutative Property of Multiplication

Changing the order of the factors does not change their product.

a·b=b·aa·b=b·a

Example 1.43

Multiply:

  1. 8·78·7
  2. 7·87·8
Try It 1.85

Multiply:

  1. 9·69·6
  2. 6·96·9
Try It 1.86

Multiply:

  1. 8·68·6
  2. 6·86·8

To multiply numbers with more than one digit, it is usually easier to write the numbers vertically in columns just as we did for addition and subtraction.

27×3___27×3___

We start by multiplying 33 by 7.7.

3×7=213×7=21

We write the 11 in the ones place of the product. We carry the 22 tens by writing 22 above the tens place.

No Alt Text

Then we multiply the 33 by the 2,2, and add the 22 above the tens place to the product. So 3×2=6,3×2=6, and 6+2=8.6+2=8. Write the 88 in the tens place of the product.

No Alt Text

The product is 81.81.

When we multiply two numbers with a different number of digits, it’s usually easier to write the smaller number on the bottom. You could write it the other way, too, but this way is easier to work with.

Example 1.44

Multiply: 15·4.15·4.

Try It 1.87

Multiply: 64·8.64·8.

Try It 1.88

Multiply: 57·6.57·6.

Example 1.45

Multiply: 286·5.286·5.

Try It 1.89

Multiply: 347·5.347·5.

Try It 1.90

Multiply: 462·7.462·7.

When we multiply by a number with two or more digits, we multiply by each of the digits separately, working from right to left. Each separate product of the digits is called a partial product. When we write partial products, we must make sure to line up the place values.

How To

Multiply two whole numbers to find the product.

  1. Step 1. Write the numbers so each place value lines up vertically.
  2. Step 2. Multiply the digits in each place value.
    • Work from right to left, starting with the ones place in the bottom number.
      • Multiply the bottom number by the ones digit in the top number, then by the tens digit, and so on.
      • If a product in a place value is more than 9,9, carry to the next place value.
      • Write the partial products, lining up the digits in the place values with the numbers above.
    • Repeat for the tens place in the bottom number, the hundreds place, and so on.
    • Insert a zero as a placeholder with each additional partial product.
  3. Step 3. Add the partial products.

Example 1.46

Multiply: 62(87).62(87).

Try It 1.91

Multiply: 43(78).43(78).

Try It 1.92

Multiply: 64(59).64(59).

Example 1.47

Multiply:

  1. 47·1047·10
  2. 47·100.47·100.
Try It 1.93

Multiply:

  1. 54·1054·10
  2. 54·100.54·100.
Try It 1.94

Multiply:

  1. 75·1075·10
  2. 75·100.75·100.

Example 1.48

Multiply: (354)(438).(354)(438).

Try It 1.95

Multiply: (265)(483).(265)(483).

Try It 1.96

Multiply: (823)(794).(823)(794).

Example 1.49

Multiply: (896)201.(896)201.

Try It 1.97

Multiply: (718)509.(718)509.

Try It 1.98

Multiply: (627)804.(627)804.

When there are three or more factors, we multiply the first two and then multiply their product by the next factor. For example:

to multiply 832832
first multiply 8383 242242
then multiply 242242. 4848

Translate Word Phrases to Math Notation

Earlier in this section, we translated math notation into words. Now we’ll reverse the process and translate word phrases into math notation. Some of the words that indicate multiplication are given in Table 1.5.

Operation Word Phrase Example Expression
Multiplication times
product
twice
33 times 88
the product of 33 and 88
twice 44
3×8,3·8,(3)(8),3×8,3·8,(3)(8),
(3)8,or3(8)(3)8,or3(8)
2·42·4
Table 1.5

Example 1.50

Translate and simplify: the product of 1212 and 27.27.

Try It 1.99

Translate and simplify the product of 1313 and 28.28.

Try It 1.100

Translate and simplify the product of 4747 and 14.14.

Example 1.51

Translate and simplify: twice two hundred eleven.

Try It 1.101

Translate and simplify: twice one hundred sixty-seven.

Try It 1.102

Translate and simplify: twice two hundred fifty-eight.

Multiply Whole Numbers in Applications

We will use the same strategy we used previously to solve applications of multiplication. First, we need to determine what we are looking for. Then we write a phrase that gives the information to find it. We then translate the phrase into math notation and simplify to get the answer. Finally, we write a sentence to answer the question.

Example 1.52

Humberto bought 44 sheets of stamps. Each sheet had 2020 stamps. How many stamps did Humberto buy?

Try It 1.103

Valia donated water for the snack bar at her son’s baseball game. She brought 66 cases of water bottles. Each case had 2424 water bottles. How many water bottles did Valia donate?

Try It 1.104

Vanessa brought 88 packs of hot dogs to a family reunion. Each pack has 1010 hot dogs. How many hot dogs did Vanessa bring?

Example 1.53

When Rena cooks rice, she uses twice as much water as rice. How much water does she need to cook 44 cups of rice?

Try It 1.105

Erin is planning her flower garden. She wants to plant twice as many dahlias as sunflowers. If she plants 14 sunflowers, how many dahlias does she need?

Try It 1.106

A college choir has twice as many women as men. There are 18 men in the choir. How many women are in the choir?

Example 1.54

Van is planning to build a patio. He will have 88 rows of tiles, with 1414 tiles in each row. How many tiles does he need for the patio?

Try It 1.107

Jane is tiling her living room floor. She will need 16 rows of tile, with 20 tiles in each row. How many tiles does she need for the living room floor?

Try It 1.108

Yousef is putting shingles on his garage roof. He will need 24 rows of shingles, with 45 shingles in each row. How many shingles does he need for the garage roof?

If we want to know the size of a wall that needs to be painted or a floor that needs to be carpeted, we will need to find its area. The area is a measure of the amount of surface that is covered by the shape. Area is measured in square units. We often use square inches, square feet, square centimeters, or square miles to measure area. A square centimeter is a square that is one centimeter (cm.) on a side. A square inch is a square that is one inch on each side, and so on.

An image of two squares, one larger than the other. The smaller square is 1 centimeter by 1 centimeter and has the label “1 square centimeter”. The larger square is 1 inch by 1 inch and has the label “1 square inch”.

For a rectangular figure, the area is the product of the length and the width. Figure 1.12 shows a rectangular rug with a length of 22 feet and a width of 33 feet. Each square is 11 foot wide by 11 foot long, or 11 square foot. The rug is made of 66 squares. The area of the rug is 66 square feet.

An image of a rectangle containing 6 blocks, 2 feet tall and 3 feet wide. This image has the label “2 times 3 = 6 feet squared”.
Figure 1.12 The area of a rectangle is the product of its length and its width, or 66 square feet.

Example 1.55

Jen’s kitchen ceiling is a rectangle that measures 9 feet long by 12 feet wide. What is the area of Jen’s kitchen ceiling?

Try It 1.109

Zoila bought a rectangular rug. The rug is 8 feet long by 5 feet wide. What is the area of the rug?

Try It 1.110

Rene’s driveway is a rectangle 45 feet long by 20 feet wide. What is the area of the driveway?

Section 1.4 Exercises

Practice Makes Perfect

Use Multiplication Notation

In the following exercises, translate from math notation to words.

225.

4×74×7

226.

8×68×6

227.

5·125·12

228.

3·93·9

229.

(10)(25)(10)(25)

230.

(20)(15)(20)(15)

231.

42(33)42(33)

232.

39(64)39(64)

Model Multiplication of Whole Numbers

In the following exercises, model the multiplication.

233.

3×63×6

234.

4×54×5

235.

5×95×9

236.

3×93×9

Multiply Whole Numbers

In the following exercises, fill in the missing values in each chart.

237.
An image of a table with 11 columns and 11 rows. The cells in the first row and first column are shaded darker than the other cells. The first column has the values “x; 0; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”. The second column has the values “0; 0; 0; null; 0; 0; 0; 0; null; 0; 0”. The third column has the values “1; 0; 1; 2; null; 4; 5; 6; null; 8; 9”. The fourth column has the values “2; 0; 2; 4; 6; null; 10; 12; 14; null; 18”. The fifth column has the values “3; null; 3; 6; null; null; 15; null; 21; 24; null”. The sixth column has the values “4; 0; null; 8; 12; 16; null; 24; null; null; 36”. The seventh column has the values “5; 0; null; null; 15; 20; null; null; 35; null; 45”. The eighth column has the values “6; 0; 6; 12; null; null; 30; null; null; 48; null”. The ninth column has the values “7; 0; 7; null; 21; 28; null; 42; null; null; null”. The tenth column has the values “8; null; 8; null; null; 32; 40; null; 56; 64; 72”. The eleventh column has the values “9; 0; null; 18; 27; null, null; 54; 63; null; null”.
238.
An image of a table with 11 columns and 11 rows. The cells in the first row and first column are shaded darker than the other cells. The first column has the values “x; 0; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”. The second column has the values “0; 0; 0; 0 pink; 0; 0; 0; 0; 0; 0; 0”. The third column has the values “1; 0; 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”. The fourth column has the values “2; 0; 2; 4; 6; 8; 10; 12; 14; 16; 18”. The fifth column has the values “3; 0; 3; 6; 9; 12; 15; 18; 21; 24; 27”. The sixth column has the values “4; 0; 4; 8; 12; 16; 20; 24; 28; 32; 36”. The seventh column has the values “5; 0; 5; 10; 15; 20; 25; 30; 35; 40; 45”. The eighth column has the values “6; 0; 6; 12; 18; 24; 30; 36; 42; 48; 54”. The ninth column has the values “7; 0; 7; 14; 21; 28; 35; 42; 49; 56; 63”. The tenth column has the values “8; 0; 8; 16; 24; 32; 40; 48; 56; 64; 72”. The eleventh column has the values “9; 0; 9; 18; 27; 36, 45; 54; 63; 72; 81”.
239.
An image of a table with 8 columns and 7 rows. The cells in the first row and first column are shaded darker than the other cells. The cells not in the first row or column are all null.  The first column has the values “x; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”. The first row has the values “x; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”.
240.
PROD: An image of a table with 7 columns and 8 rows. The cells in the first row and first column are shaded darker than the other cells. The cells not in the first row or column are all null.  The first column has the values “x; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”. The first row has the values “x; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”.
241.
An image of a table with 8 columns and 5 rows. The cells in the first row and first column are shaded darker than the other cells. The cells not in the first row or column are all null.  The first row has the values “x; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”. The first column has the values “x;  6; 7; 8; 9”.
242.
An image of a table with 5 columns and 8 rows. The cells in the first row and first column are shaded darker than the other cells. The cells not in the first row or column are all null. The first column has the values “x; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”. The first row has the values “x; 6; 7; 8; 9”.
243.
PROD: An image of a table with 6 columns and 6 rows. The cells in the first row and first column are shaded darker than the other cells. The cells not in the first row or column are all null.  The first column has the values “x; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”. The first row has the values “x; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”.
244.
An image of a table with 6 columns and 6 rows. The cells in the first row and first column are shaded darker than the other cells. The cells not in the first row or column are all null.  The first column has the values “x; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”. The first row has the values “x; 5; 6; 7; 8; 9”.

In the following exercises, multiply.

245.

0·150·15

246.

0·410·41

247.

(99)0(99)0

248.

(77)0(77)0

249.

1·431·43

250.

1·341·34

251.

(28)1(28)1

252.

(65)1(65)1

253.

1(240,055)1(240,055)

254.

1(189,206)1(189,206)

255.
  1. 7·67·6
  2. 6·76·7
256.
  1. 8×98×9
  2. 9×89×8
257.

(79)(5)(79)(5)

258.

(58)(4)(58)(4)

259.

275·6275·6

260.

638·5638·5

261.

3,421×73,421×7

262.

9,143×39,143×3

263.

52(38)52(38)

264.

37(45)37(45)

265.

96·7396·73

266.

89·5689·56

267.

27×8527×85

268.

53×9853×98

269.

23·1023·10

270.

19·1019·10

271.

(100)(36)(100)(36)

272.

(100)(25)(100)(25)

273.

1,000(88)1,000(88)

274.

1,000(46)1,000(46)

275.

50×1,000,00050×1,000,000

276.

30×1,000,00030×1,000,000

277.

247×139247×139

278.

156×328156×328

279.

586(721)586(721)

280.

472(855)472(855)

281.

915·879915·879

282.

968·926968·926

283.

(104)(256)(104)(256)

284.

(103)(497)(103)(497)

285.

348(705)348(705)

286.

485(602)485(602)

287.

2,719×5432,719×543

288.

3,581×7243,581×724

Translate Word Phrases to Math Notation

In the following exercises, translate and simplify.

289.

the product of 1818 and 3333

290.

the product of 1515 and 2222

291.

fifty-one times sixty-seven

292.

forty-eight times seventy-one

293.

twice 249249

294.

twice 589589

295.

ten times three hundred seventy-five

296.

ten times two hundred fifty-five

Mixed Practice

In the following exercises, simplify.

297.

38×3738×37

298.

86×2986×29

299.

415267415267

300.

341285341285

301.

6,251+4,7496,251+4,749

302.

3,816+8,1843,816+8,184

303.

(56)(204)(56)(204)

304.

(77)(801)(77)(801)

305.

947·0947·0

306.

947+0947+0

307.

15,382+115,382+1

308.

15,382·115,382·1

In the following exercises, translate and simplify.

309.

the difference of 50 and 18

310.

the difference of 90 and 66

311.

twice 35

312.

twice 140

313.

20 more than 980

314.

65 more than 325

315.

the product of 12 and 875

316.

the product of 15 and 905

317.

subtract 74 from 89

318.

subtract 45 from 99

319.

the sum of 3,075 and 95

320.

the sum of 6,308 and 724

321.

366 less than 814

322.

388 less than 925

Multiply Whole Numbers in Applications

In the following exercises, solve.

323.

Party supplies Tim brought 9 six-packs of soda to a club party. How many cans of soda did Tim bring?

324.

Sewing Kanisha is making a quilt. She bought 6 cards of buttons. Each card had four buttons on it. How many buttons did Kanisha buy?

325.

Field trip Seven school busses let off their students in front of a museum in Washington, DC. Each school bus had 44 students. How many students were there?

326.

Gardening Kathryn bought 8 flats of impatiens for her flower bed. Each flat has 24 flowers. How many flowers did Kathryn buy?

327.

Charity Rey donated 15 twelve-packs of t-shirts to a homeless shelter. How many t-shirts did he donate?

328.

School There are 28 classrooms at Anna C. Scott elementary school. Each classroom has 26 student desks. What is the total number of student desks?

329.

Recipe Stephanie is making punch for a party. The recipe calls for twice as much fruit juice as club soda. If she uses 10 cups of club soda, how much fruit juice should she use?

330.

Gardening Hiroko is putting in a vegetable garden. He wants to have twice as many lettuce plants as tomato plants. If he buys 12 tomato plants, how many lettuce plants should he get?

331.

Government The United States Senate has twice as many senators as there are states in the United States. There are 50 states. How many senators are there in the United States Senate?

332.

Recipe Andrea is making potato salad for a buffet luncheon. The recipe says the number of servings of potato salad will be twice the number of pounds of potatoes. If she buys 30 pounds of potatoes, how many servings of potato salad will there be?

333.

Painting Jane is painting one wall of her living room. The wall is rectangular, 13 feet wide by 9 feet high. What is the area of the wall?

334.

Home décor Shawnte bought a rug for the hall of her apartment. The rug is 3 feet wide by 18 feet long. What is the area of the rug?

335.

Room size The meeting room in a senior center is rectangular, with length 42 feet and width 34 feet. What is the area of the meeting room?

336.

Gardening June has a vegetable garden in her yard. The garden is rectangular, with length 23 feet and width 28 feet. What is the area of the garden?

337.

NCAA basketball According to NCAA regulations, the dimensions of a rectangular basketball court must be 94 feet by 50 feet. What is the area of the basketball court?

338.

NCAA football According to NCAA regulations, the dimensions of a rectangular football field must be 360 feet by 160 feet. What is the area of the football field?

Everyday Math

339.

Stock market Javier owns 300 shares of stock in one company. On Tuesday, the stock price rose $12$12 per share. How much money did Javier’s portfolio gain?


340.

Salary Carlton got a $200$200 raise in each paycheck. He gets paid 24 times a year. How much higher is his new annual salary?

Writing Exercises

341.

How confident do you feel about your knowledge of the multiplication facts? If you are not fully confident, what will you do to improve your skills?

342.

How have you used models to help you learn the multiplication facts?

Self Check

After completing the exercises, use this checklist to evaluate your mastery of the objectives of this section.

.

On a scale of 1–10, how would you rate your mastery of this section in light of your responses on the checklist? How can you improve this?

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