Skip to ContentGo to accessibility pageKeyboard shortcuts menu
OpenStax Logo

accountable care organizations (ACOs)
payment model in large health systems where individual physician practices or a collection of physician practices contract with a payer, typically under a fee-for-service payment model, to provide care to a population
bundled payments
payment model in which physician practices receive payment based on episodes of client care according to a defined set of diagnoses and services provided to the client over a specific period; also known as episode-based payments
capitation
payment model in which physician practices receive payment per client per period, which is usually 1 month; health plan rules govern which clients are included in the physician practice
care delivery models
delivery strategies that prescribe the specific ways in which professionals work together to provide health care services
care deserts
areas in the United States where individuals have limited access to health care services such as hospitals or health clinics; also called medical deserts
episode-based payments
payment model in which physician practices receive payment based on episodes of client care according to a defined set of diagnoses and services provided to the client over a specific period; also known as bundled payments
fee-for-service
payment model in which physician practices are paid a flat rate for each client visit, test, or procedure performed; through this model, practices can achieve higher revenue with more clients and procedures each day
health disparities
systematic differences in health that exist between socioeconomic positions, social classes, genders, ethnicities, sexual orientations, or other social groups with differentiated access to material and non-material resources
health literacy
the degree to which individuals have the capacity to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services needed to make appropriate health decisions
health outcomes
the results of a health intervention
Healthy People
a 10-year HHS plan that establishes public health priorities and data-driven objectives to improve public health and well-being over a decade
integrated service lines
hospitals and health systems organize around specific disease states such as cancer, heart disease, and diabetes throughout the continuum of client care
leading health indicators (LHIs)
small subset of high-priority Healthy People 2030 objectives selected to drive action toward improving health and well-being
marginalized communities
communities excluded from the dominant group’s cultural, economic, educational, or social life
maternal care deserts
areas within the United States where individuals have limited to no access to maternal care services
medical deserts
areas within the United States where individuals have limited access to health care services such as hospitals or health clinics; also called care deserts
medical homes
care delivery model in which an integrated team of health care providers such as nurses, physicians, and care managers provides care that addresses the “whole person”
pay for performance
payment model in which physicians are paid according to prescribed practice performance on defined metrics, which are based upon the quality of care and/or utilization of care services
payment models
mechanism by which health care services are established and paid for
pharmacy deserts
areas in the United States where individuals have limited to no access to pharmacy services
provider-sponsored health plans
health plans that are either sponsored or acquired by hospitals, physician groups, or health systems that assume responsibility for the total cost of care for clients enrolled in the health plan
public health policy
laws, regulations, programs, behaviors, and decisions implemented in a society to promote public health
Quintuple Aim
a proposed update to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement’s Triple Aim
retainer-based payment
payment model in which physician practices or other organizations receive capitation payments from the client; also known as “concierge” payments
shared savings programs
payment model in which physicians or health care practices receive payment throughout the contract year; total costs of care for a specific client population are compared with a cost target at the end of year, which can lead to a lump-sum payment incentive or penalty for not meeting prescribed goals
supply chain
participants at each step in the process that takes a product from raw materials to a finished good that is sold to customers
telehealth
the provision of health care using technology, including the internet, computers, tablets, and smartphones
Triple Aim
a framework developed by the Institute for Healthcare Improvement that describes an approach to optimizing health system performance
universal health care system
a system in which all people have access to the full range of quality health services they need, when and where they need them, without financial hardship
Citation/Attribution

This book may not be used in the training of large language models or otherwise be ingested into large language models or generative AI offerings without OpenStax's permission.

Want to cite, share, or modify this book? This book uses the Creative Commons Attribution License and you must attribute OpenStax.

Attribution information
  • If you are redistributing all or part of this book in a print format, then you must include on every physical page the following attribution:
    Access for free at https://openstax.org/books/population-health/pages/1-introduction
  • If you are redistributing all or part of this book in a digital format, then you must include on every digital page view the following attribution:
    Access for free at https://openstax.org/books/population-health/pages/1-introduction
Citation information

© Apr 26, 2024 OpenStax. Textbook content produced by OpenStax is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License . The OpenStax name, OpenStax logo, OpenStax book covers, OpenStax CNX name, and OpenStax CNX logo are not subject to the Creative Commons license and may not be reproduced without the prior and express written consent of Rice University.