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Calculus Volume 3

Introduction

Calculus Volume 3Introduction
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  1. Preface
  2. 1 Parametric Equations and Polar Coordinates
    1. Introduction
    2. 1.1 Parametric Equations
    3. 1.2 Calculus of Parametric Curves
    4. 1.3 Polar Coordinates
    5. 1.4 Area and Arc Length in Polar Coordinates
    6. 1.5 Conic Sections
    7. Key Terms
    8. Key Equations
    9. Key Concepts
    10. Chapter Review Exercises
  3. 2 Vectors in Space
    1. Introduction
    2. 2.1 Vectors in the Plane
    3. 2.2 Vectors in Three Dimensions
    4. 2.3 The Dot Product
    5. 2.4 The Cross Product
    6. 2.5 Equations of Lines and Planes in Space
    7. 2.6 Quadric Surfaces
    8. 2.7 Cylindrical and Spherical Coordinates
    9. Key Terms
    10. Key Equations
    11. Key Concepts
    12. Chapter Review Exercises
  4. 3 Vector-Valued Functions
    1. Introduction
    2. 3.1 Vector-Valued Functions and Space Curves
    3. 3.2 Calculus of Vector-Valued Functions
    4. 3.3 Arc Length and Curvature
    5. 3.4 Motion in Space
    6. Key Terms
    7. Key Equations
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Chapter Review Exercises
  5. 4 Differentiation of Functions of Several Variables
    1. Introduction
    2. 4.1 Functions of Several Variables
    3. 4.2 Limits and Continuity
    4. 4.3 Partial Derivatives
    5. 4.4 Tangent Planes and Linear Approximations
    6. 4.5 The Chain Rule
    7. 4.6 Directional Derivatives and the Gradient
    8. 4.7 Maxima/Minima Problems
    9. 4.8 Lagrange Multipliers
    10. Key Terms
    11. Key Equations
    12. Key Concepts
    13. Chapter Review Exercises
  6. 5 Multiple Integration
    1. Introduction
    2. 5.1 Double Integrals over Rectangular Regions
    3. 5.2 Double Integrals over General Regions
    4. 5.3 Double Integrals in Polar Coordinates
    5. 5.4 Triple Integrals
    6. 5.5 Triple Integrals in Cylindrical and Spherical Coordinates
    7. 5.6 Calculating Centers of Mass and Moments of Inertia
    8. 5.7 Change of Variables in Multiple Integrals
    9. Key Terms
    10. Key Equations
    11. Key Concepts
    12. Chapter Review Exercises
  7. 6 Vector Calculus
    1. Introduction
    2. 6.1 Vector Fields
    3. 6.2 Line Integrals
    4. 6.3 Conservative Vector Fields
    5. 6.4 Green’s Theorem
    6. 6.5 Divergence and Curl
    7. 6.6 Surface Integrals
    8. 6.7 Stokes’ Theorem
    9. 6.8 The Divergence Theorem
    10. Key Terms
    11. Key Equations
    12. Key Concepts
    13. Chapter Review Exercises
  8. 7 Second-Order Differential Equations
    1. Introduction
    2. 7.1 Second-Order Linear Equations
    3. 7.2 Nonhomogeneous Linear Equations
    4. 7.3 Applications
    5. 7.4 Series Solutions of Differential Equations
    6. Key Terms
    7. Key Equations
    8. Key Concepts
    9. Chapter Review Exercises
  9. A | Table of Integrals
  10. B | Table of Derivatives
  11. C | Review of Pre-Calculus
  12. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
  13. Index
A photo of a cross section of a seashell that spirals from big chambers to smaller and smaller ones.
Figure 1.1 The chambered nautilus is a marine animal that lives in the tropical Pacific Ocean. Scientists think they have existed mostly unchanged for about 500 million years.(credit: modification of work by Jitze Couperus, Flickr)

The chambered nautilus is a fascinating creature. This animal feeds on hermit crabs, fish, and other crustaceans. It has a hard outer shell with many chambers connected in a spiral fashion, and it can retract into its shell to avoid predators. When part of the shell is cut away, a perfect spiral is revealed, with chambers inside that are somewhat similar to growth rings in a tree.

The mathematical function that describes a spiral can be expressed using rectangular (or Cartesian) coordinates. However, if we change our coordinate system to something that works a bit better with circular patterns, the function becomes much simpler to describe. The polar coordinate system is well suited for describing curves of this type. How can we use this coordinate system to describe spirals and other radial figures? (See Example 1.14.)

In this chapter we also study parametric equations, which give us a convenient way to describe curves, or to study the position of a particle or object in two dimensions as a function of time. We will use parametric equations and polar coordinates for describing many topics later in this text.

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