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  1. Preface
  2. 1 American Law, Legal Reasoning, and the Legal System
    1. Introduction
    2. 1.1 Basic American Legal Principles
    3. 1.2 Sources and Types of Law
    4. 1.3 Important Business Laws and Regulations
    5. Assessment Questions
    6. End Notes
  3. 2 Disputes and Dispute Settlement
    1. Introduction
    2. 2.1 Negotiation
    3. 2.2 Mediation
    4. 2.3 Arbitration
    5. Assessment Questions
    6. End Notes
  4. 3 Business Ethics and Social Responsibility
    1. Introduction
    2. 3.1 Business Ethics
    3. 3.2 Social Responsibility
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  5. 4 Business and the United States Constitution
    1. Introduction
    2. 4.1 Commerce Clause
    3. 4.2 Constitutional Protections
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  6. 5 Criminal Liability
    1. Introduction
    2. 5.1 Common Business Crimes
    3. 5.2 Civil vs. Criminal Liability
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  7. 6 The Tort System
    1. Introduction
    2. 6.1 Intentional Torts and Negligence
    3. 6.2 Product and Strict Liability
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  8. 7 Contract Law
    1. Introduction
    2. 7.1 Agreement, Consideration, and Promissory Estoppel
    3. 7.2 Capacity and Legality
    4. 7.3 Breach of Contract and Remedies
    5. Assessment Questions
    6. End Notes
  9. 8 Sales Contracts
    1. Introduction
    2. 8.1 The Nature and Origins of Sales Contracts
    3. 8.2 Warranties and Sales Contracts
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  10. 9 Employment and Labor Law
    1. Introduction
    2. 9.1 Employment, Worker Protection, and Immigration Law
    3. 9.2 Labor Law
    4. 9.3 Equal Opportunity in Employment
    5. Assessment Questions
    6. End Notes
  11. 10 Government Regulation
    1. Introduction
    2. 10.1 Administrative Law
    3. 10.2 Regulatory Agencies
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  12. 11 Antitrust Law
    1. Introduction
    2. 11.1 History of Antitrust Law
    3. 11.2 Antitrust Laws
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  13. 12 Unfair Trade Practices and the Federal Trade Commission
    1. Introduction
    2. 12.1 Unfair Trade Practices
    3. 12.2 The Federal Trade Commission
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  14. 13 International Law
    1. Introduction
    2. 13.1 Introduction to International Law
    3. 13.2 Sources and Practice of International Law
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  15. 14 Securities Regulation
    1. Introduction
    2. 14.1 Liability Under the Securities Act
    3. 14.2 The Framework of Securities Regulation
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  16. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
    12. Chapter 12
    13. Chapter 13
    14. Chapter 14
  17. Index
1.

Compared to other countries in the West, stringent and extensive employee protections came fairly late to the United States. Up until 1959, for example, employers had the right to fire a worker without giving any reason. This concept, which was known as at-will employment, was applicable in all states. The concept of at-will employment does, however, continue today, and all employees are considered to be at-will unless they are employed under a collective bargaining agreement, or under a contract for a set duration. Employers can still fire employees for any reason, but they cannot be fired for illegal reasons, as set out in the U.S. or state constitutions, federal law, state statutes, or public policy. In this section, some of the main employee rights and company responsibilities will be introduced.

3.

a

5.

d

7.

A trade union, or labor union, is an organized group of workers who come together to lobby employers about conditions affecting their work.

9.

b

11.

The Civil Rights Act provides broad provisions pertaining to citizens’ civil rights. Title VII of the Civil Rights Act deals with discrimination in employment. It bans employers from discriminating against employees in their hiring, firing, and promotion practices on the basis of sex, national origin, color, religion, or race. All employers who are engaged in commercial activity and who employ 15 or more employees for 20 consecutive weeks in a year are covered by the Act.

13.

c

15.

a

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© Nov 26, 2019 OpenStax. Textbook content produced by OpenStax is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License 4.0 license. The OpenStax name, OpenStax logo, OpenStax book covers, OpenStax CNX name, and OpenStax CNX logo are not subject to the Creative Commons license and may not be reproduced without the prior and express written consent of Rice University.