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  1. Preface
  2. 1 Role of Accounting in Society
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 1.1 Explain the Importance of Accounting and Distinguish between Financial and Managerial Accounting
    3. 1.2 Identify Users of Accounting Information and How They Apply Information
    4. 1.3 Describe Typical Accounting Activities and the Role Accountants Play in Identifying, Recording, and Reporting Financial Activities
    5. 1.4 Explain Why Accounting Is Important to Business Stakeholders
    6. 1.5 Describe the Varied Career Paths Open to Individuals with an Accounting Education
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
  3. 2 Introduction to Financial Statements
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 2.1 Describe the Income Statement, Statement of Owner’s Equity, Balance Sheet, and Statement of Cash Flows, and How They Interrelate
    3. 2.2 Define, Explain, and Provide Examples of Current and Noncurrent Assets, Current and Noncurrent Liabilities, Equity, Revenues, and Expenses
    4. 2.3 Prepare an Income Statement, Statement of Owner’s Equity, and Balance Sheet
    5. Key Terms
    6. Summary
    7. Multiple Choice
    8. Questions
    9. Exercise Set A
    10. Exercise Set B
    11. Problem Set A
    12. Problem Set B
    13. Thought Provokers
  4. 3 Analyzing and Recording Transactions
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 3.1 Describe Principles, Assumptions, and Concepts of Accounting and Their Relationship to Financial Statements
    3. 3.2 Define and Describe the Expanded Accounting Equation and Its Relationship to Analyzing Transactions
    4. 3.3 Define and Describe the Initial Steps in the Accounting Cycle
    5. 3.4 Analyze Business Transactions Using the Accounting Equation and Show the Impact of Business Transactions on Financial Statements
    6. 3.5 Use Journal Entries to Record Transactions and Post to T-Accounts
    7. 3.6 Prepare a Trial Balance
    8. Key Terms
    9. Summary
    10. Multiple Choice
    11. Questions
    12. Exercise Set A
    13. Exercise Set B
    14. Problem Set A
    15. Problem Set B
    16. Thought Provokers
  5. 4 The Adjustment Process
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 4.1 Explain the Concepts and Guidelines Affecting Adjusting Entries
    3. 4.2 Discuss the Adjustment Process and Illustrate Common Types of Adjusting Entries
    4. 4.3 Record and Post the Common Types of Adjusting Entries
    5. 4.4 Use the Ledger Balances to Prepare an Adjusted Trial Balance
    6. 4.5 Prepare Financial Statements Using the Adjusted Trial Balance
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  6. 5 Completing the Accounting Cycle
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 5.1 Describe and Prepare Closing Entries for a Business
    3. 5.2 Prepare a Post-Closing Trial Balance
    4. 5.3 Apply the Results from the Adjusted Trial Balance to Compute Current Ratio and Working Capital Balance, and Explain How These Measures Represent Liquidity
    5. 5.4 Appendix: Complete a Comprehensive Accounting Cycle for a Business
    6. Key Terms
    7. Summary
    8. Multiple Choice
    9. Questions
    10. Exercise Set A
    11. Exercise Set B
    12. Problem Set A
    13. Problem Set B
    14. Thought Provokers
  7. 6 Merchandising Transactions
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 6.1 Compare and Contrast Merchandising versus Service Activities and Transactions
    3. 6.2 Compare and Contrast Perpetual versus Periodic Inventory Systems
    4. 6.3 Analyze and Record Transactions for Merchandise Purchases Using the Perpetual Inventory System
    5. 6.4 Analyze and Record Transactions for the Sale of Merchandise Using the Perpetual Inventory System
    6. 6.5 Discuss and Record Transactions Applying the Two Commonly Used Freight-In Methods
    7. 6.6 Describe and Prepare Multi-Step and Simple Income Statements for Merchandising Companies
    8. 6.7 Appendix: Analyze and Record Transactions for Merchandise Purchases and Sales Using the Periodic Inventory System
    9. Key Terms
    10. Summary
    11. Multiple Choice
    12. Questions
    13. Exercise Set A
    14. Exercise Set B
    15. Problem Set A
    16. Problem Set B
    17. Thought Provokers
  8. 7 Accounting Information Systems
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 7.1 Define and Describe the Components of an Accounting Information System
    3. 7.2 Describe and Explain the Purpose of Special Journals and Their Importance to Stakeholders
    4. 7.3 Analyze and Journalize Transactions Using Special Journals
    5. 7.4 Prepare a Subsidiary Ledger
    6. 7.5 Describe Career Paths Open to Individuals with a Joint Education in Accounting and Information Systems
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  9. 8 Fraud, Internal Controls, and Cash
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 8.1 Analyze Fraud in the Accounting Workplace
    3. 8.2 Define and Explain Internal Controls and Their Purpose within an Organization
    4. 8.3 Describe Internal Controls within an Organization
    5. 8.4 Define the Purpose and Use of a Petty Cash Fund, and Prepare Petty Cash Journal Entries
    6. 8.5 Discuss Management Responsibilities for Maintaining Internal Controls within an Organization
    7. 8.6 Define the Purpose of a Bank Reconciliation, and Prepare a Bank Reconciliation and Its Associated Journal Entries
    8. 8.7 Describe Fraud in Financial Statements and Sarbanes-Oxley Act Requirements
    9. Key Terms
    10. Summary
    11. Multiple Choice
    12. Questions
    13. Exercise Set A
    14. Exercise Set B
    15. Problem Set A
    16. Problem Set B
    17. Thought Provokers
  10. 9 Accounting for Receivables
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 9.1 Explain the Revenue Recognition Principle and How It Relates to Current and Future Sales and Purchase Transactions
    3. 9.2 Account for Uncollectible Accounts Using the Balance Sheet and Income Statement Approaches
    4. 9.3 Determine the Efficiency of Receivables Management Using Financial Ratios
    5. 9.4 Discuss the Role of Accounting for Receivables in Earnings Management
    6. 9.5 Apply Revenue Recognition Principles to Long-Term Projects
    7. 9.6 Explain How Notes Receivable and Accounts Receivable Differ
    8. 9.7 Appendix: Comprehensive Example of Bad Debt Estimation
    9. Key Terms
    10. Summary
    11. Multiple Choice
    12. Questions
    13. Exercise Set A
    14. Exercise Set B
    15. Problem Set A
    16. Problem Set B
    17. Thought Provokers
  11. 10 Inventory
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 10.1 Describe and Demonstrate the Basic Inventory Valuation Methods and Their Cost Flow Assumptions
    3. 10.2 Calculate the Cost of Goods Sold and Ending Inventory Using the Periodic Method
    4. 10.3 Calculate the Cost of Goods Sold and Ending Inventory Using the Perpetual Method
    5. 10.4 Explain and Demonstrate the Impact of Inventory Valuation Errors on the Income Statement and Balance Sheet
    6. 10.5 Examine the Efficiency of Inventory Management Using Financial Ratios
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  12. 11 Long-Term Assets
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 11.1 Distinguish between Tangible and Intangible Assets
    3. 11.2 Analyze and Classify Capitalized Costs versus Expenses
    4. 11.3 Explain and Apply Depreciation Methods to Allocate Capitalized Costs
    5. 11.4 Describe Accounting for Intangible Assets and Record Related Transactions
    6. 11.5 Describe Some Special Issues in Accounting for Long-Term Assets
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  13. 12 Current Liabilities
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 12.1 Identify and Describe Current Liabilities
    3. 12.2 Analyze, Journalize, and Report Current Liabilities
    4. 12.3 Define and Apply Accounting Treatment for Contingent Liabilities
    5. 12.4 Prepare Journal Entries to Record Short-Term Notes Payable
    6. 12.5 Record Transactions Incurred in Preparing Payroll
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  14. 13 Long-Term Liabilities
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 13.1 Explain the Pricing of Long-Term Liabilities
    3. 13.2 Compute Amortization of Long-Term Liabilities Using the Effective-Interest Method
    4. 13.3 Prepare Journal Entries to Reflect the Life Cycle of Bonds
    5. 13.4 Appendix: Special Topics Related to Long-Term Liabilities
    6. Key Terms
    7. Summary
    8. Multiple Choice
    9. Questions
    10. Exercise Set A
    11. Exercise Set B
    12. Problem Set A
    13. Problem Set B
    14. Thought Provokers
  15. 14 Corporation Accounting
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 14.1 Explain the Process of Securing Equity Financing through the Issuance of Stock
    3. 14.2 Analyze and Record Transactions for the Issuance and Repurchase of Stock
    4. 14.3 Record Transactions and the Effects on Financial Statements for Cash Dividends, Property Dividends, Stock Dividends, and Stock Splits
    5. 14.4 Compare and Contrast Owners’ Equity versus Retained Earnings
    6. 14.5 Discuss the Applicability of Earnings per Share as a Method to Measure Performance
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  16. 15 Partnership Accounting
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 15.1 Describe the Advantages and Disadvantages of Organizing as a Partnership
    3. 15.2 Describe How a Partnership Is Created, Including the Associated Journal Entries
    4. 15.3 Compute and Allocate Partners’ Share of Income and Loss
    5. 15.4 Prepare Journal Entries to Record the Admission and Withdrawal of a Partner
    6. 15.5 Discuss and Record Entries for the Dissolution of a Partnership
    7. Key Terms
    8. Summary
    9. Multiple Choice
    10. Questions
    11. Exercise Set A
    12. Exercise Set B
    13. Problem Set A
    14. Problem Set B
    15. Thought Provokers
  17. 16 Statement of Cash Flows
    1. Why It Matters
    2. 16.1 Explain the Purpose of the Statement of Cash Flows
    3. 16.2 Differentiate between Operating, Investing, and Financing Activities
    4. 16.3 Prepare the Statement of Cash Flows Using the Indirect Method
    5. 16.4 Prepare the Completed Statement of Cash Flows Using the Indirect Method
    6. 16.5 Use Information from the Statement of Cash Flows to Prepare Ratios to Assess Liquidity and Solvency
    7. 16.6 Appendix: Prepare a Completed Statement of Cash Flows Using the Direct Method
    8. Key Terms
    9. Summary
    10. Multiple Choice
    11. Questions
    12. Exercise Set A
    13. Exercise Set B
    14. Problem Set A
    15. Problem Set B
    16. Thought Provokers
  18. Financial Statement Analysis
  19. Time Value of Money
  20. Suggested Resources
  21. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
    12. Chapter 12
    13. Chapter 13
    14. Chapter 14
    15. Chapter 15
    16. Chapter 16
  22. Index
1.

LO 14.1Which of the following is not a characteristic that sets preferred stock apart from common stock?

  1. voting rights
  2. dividend payments
  3. transferability
  4. ownership
2.

LO 14.1Issued stock is defined as stock that ________.

  1. is available for sale
  2. that is held by the corporation
  3. has been sold to investors
  4. has no voting rights
3.

LO 14.1Your friend is considering incorporating and asks for advice. Which of the following is not a major concern?

  1. colors for the logo
  2. which state in which to incorporate
  3. number of shares of stock to authorize
  4. selection of the corporation name
4.

LO 14.1Par value of a stock refers to the ________.

  1. issue price of a stock
  2. value assigned by the incorporation documents
  3. maximum selling price of a stock
  4. dividend to be paid by the corporation
5.

LO 14.1Which of the following is not one of the five primary responsibilities of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the SEC)?

  1. inform and protect investors
  2. regulate securities law
  3. facilitate capital formation
  4. assure that dividends are paid by corporations
6.

LO 14.1When a C corporation has only one class of stock it is referred to as ________.

  1. stated value stock
  2. par value stock
  3. common stock
  4. preferred stock
7.

LO 14.1The number of shares that a corporation’s incorporation documents allows it to sell is referred to as ________.

  1. issued stock
  2. outstanding stock
  3. common stock
  4. authorized stock
8.

LO 14.2The total amount of cash and other assets received by a corporation from the stockholders in exchange for the shares is ________.

  1. always equal to par value
  2. referred to as retained earnings
  3. always below its stated value
  4. referred to as paid-in capital
9.

LO 14.2Stock can be issued for all except which of the following?

  1. accounts payable
  2. state income tax payments
  3. property such as a delivery truck
  4. services provided to the corporation such as legal fees
10.

LO 14.3A company issued 40 shares of $1 par value common stock for $5,000. The journal entry to record the transaction would include which of the following?

  1. debit of $4,000 to common stock
  2. credit of $20,000 to common stock
  3. credit of $40 to common stock
  4. debit of $20,000 to common stock
11.

LO 14.3A company issued 30 shares of $.50 par value common stock for $12,000. The credit to additional paid-in capital would be ________.

  1. $11,985
  2. $12,000
  3. $15
  4. $10,150
12.

LO 14.3A corporation issued 100 shares of $100 par value preferred stock for $150 per share. The resulting journal entry would include which of the following?

  1. a credit to common stock
  2. a credit to cash
  3. a debit to paid-in capital in excess of preferred stock
  4. a debit to cash
13.

LO 14.3The date the board of directors votes to declare and pay a cash dividend is called the:

  1. date of stockholder’s meeting
  2. date of payment
  3. date of declaration
  4. date of liquidation
14.

LO 14.3Which of the following is true of a stock dividend?

  1. It is a liability.
  2. The decision to issue a stock dividend resides with shareholders.
  3. It does not affect total equity but transfers amounts between equity components.
  4. It creates a cash reserve for shareholders.
15.

LO 14.4Stockholders’ equity consists of which of the following?

  1. bonds payable
  2. retained earnings and accounts receivable
  3. retained earnings and paid-in capital
  4. discounts and premiums on bond payable
16.

LO 14.4Retained earnings is accurately described by all except which of the following statements?

  1. Retained earnings is the primary component of a company’s earned capital.
  2. Dividends declared are added to retained earnings.
  3. Net income is added to retained earnings.
  4. Net losses are accumulated in the retained earnings account.
17.

LO 14.4If a company’s board of directors designates a portion of earnings for a particular purpose due to legal or contractual obligations, they are designated as ________.

  1. retained earnings payable
  2. appropriated retained earnings
  3. cumulative retained earnings
  4. restricted retained earnings
18.

LO 14.4Corrections of errors that occurred on a previous period’s financial statements are called ________.

  1. restrictions
  2. deficits
  3. prior period adjustments
  4. restatements
19.

LO 14.4Owner’s equity represents which of the following?

  1. the amount of funding the company has from issuing bonds
  2. the sum of the retained earnings and accounts receivable account balances
  3. the total of retained earnings plus paid-in capital
  4. the business owner’s/owners’ share of the company, also known as net worth or net assets
20.

LO 14.5Which of the following is a measurement of earnings that represents the profit before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization are subtracted?

  1. net income
  2. retained earnings
  3. EBITDA
  4. EPS
21.

LO 14.5Which of the following measures the portion of a corporation’s profit allocated to each outstanding share of common stock?

  1. retained earnings
  2. EPS
  3. EBITDA
  4. NOPAT
22.

LO 14.5The measurement of earnings concept that consists of a company’s profit from operations after taxed are subtracted is ________.

  1. ROI
  2. EPS
  3. EBITDA
  4. NOPAT
23.

LO 14.5The correct formula for the calculation of earnings per share is ________.

  1. (Net income + Preferred dividends) / Weighted average common shares outstanding
  2. Net income / Weighted average common shares outstanding
  3. (Net income – Preferred dividends) / Weighted average common shares outstanding
  4. (Net income – Preferred dividends) / Treasury shares outstanding
24.

LO 14.5Most analysts believe which of the following is true about EPS?

  1. Consistent improvement in EPS year after year is the indication of continuous improvement in the company’s earning power.
  2. Consistent improvement in EPS year after year is the indication of continuous decline in the company’s earning power.
  3. Consistent improvement in EPS year after year is the indication of fraud within the company.
  4. Consistent improvement in EPS year after year is the indication that the company will never suffer a year of net loss rather than net income.
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