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Maternal Newborn Nursing

Competency-Based Assessments

Maternal Newborn NursingCompetency-Based Assessments

Competency-Based Assessments

1 .
A patient in active labor experiences a persistent arrest of descent. How should a nurse explain the pelvic causes of dystocia in this case, and what nursing strategies might a nurse employ to manage dystocia related to pelvic factors?
2 .
A laboring patient presents with a persistent occiput posterior position. How should a nurse explain the fetal causes of dystocia in this situation, and what nursing interventions might be beneficial in managing dystocia related to fetal factors?
3 .
A patient in active labor shows signs of slowed progress. How should a nurse explain the reasons for augmenting labor, and what nursing actions could be employed to facilitate the augmentation process?
4 .
A patient experiences variable decelerations in fetal heart rate patterns, and the health-care provider orders amnioinfusion. How would you explain the reasons for amnioinfusion, and what nursing actions should be implemented during and after the procedure?
5 .
A pregnant patient has a preexisting endocrine condition like diabetes. How should a nurse explain the pathophysiology of endocrine conditions that can place the birth at risk, and what nursing strategies might be employed to manage and optimize outcomes in such cases?
6 .
A pregnant patient has a preexisting musculoskeletal condition, such as scoliosis. How should a nurse explain the pathophysiology of musculoskeletal conditions that can place the birth at risk, and what nursing considerations should be taken into account for managing labor and delivery in such cases?
7 .
A laboring patient is experiencing prolonged second stage labor. How would you recognize the need for forceps assistance, and what obstetric indications would justify the use of forceps during birth? Additionally, what nursing considerations should be taken into account?
8 .
A laboring person is being prepared for an operative vaginal birth. What nursing care considerations should be discussed with the patient and the health-care team? How can a nurse provide support to the patient during this process?
9 .
A delivery is complicated by shoulder dystocia. What maneuvers can be employed to resolve shoulder dystocia, and how do you prioritize them? Discuss the potential complications of shoulder dystocia and how nursing actions contribute to minimizing risks.
10 .
Describe prolapsed cord, the nursing actions in response to prolapsed cord, and the potential complications associated with this obstetric emergency.
11 .
A patient is suspected of having uterine rupture. How can nursing actions contribute to the early detection and management of uterine rupture? Discuss the potential complications associated with uterine rupture and the role of the nurse in minimizing risks.
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