Skip to Content
OpenStax Logo
Introductory Statistics

7.4 Central Limit Theorem (Pocket Change)

Introductory Statistics7.4 Central Limit Theorem (Pocket Change)
Buy book
  1. Preface
  2. 1 Sampling and Data
    1. Introduction
    2. 1.1 Definitions of Statistics, Probability, and Key Terms
    3. 1.2 Data, Sampling, and Variation in Data and Sampling
    4. 1.3 Frequency, Frequency Tables, and Levels of Measurement
    5. 1.4 Experimental Design and Ethics
    6. 1.5 Data Collection Experiment
    7. 1.6 Sampling Experiment
    8. Key Terms
    9. Chapter Review
    10. Practice
    11. Homework
    12. Bringing It Together: Homework
    13. References
    14. Solutions
  3. 2 Descriptive Statistics
    1. Introduction
    2. 2.1 Stem-and-Leaf Graphs (Stemplots), Line Graphs, and Bar Graphs
    3. 2.2 Histograms, Frequency Polygons, and Time Series Graphs
    4. 2.3 Measures of the Location of the Data
    5. 2.4 Box Plots
    6. 2.5 Measures of the Center of the Data
    7. 2.6 Skewness and the Mean, Median, and Mode
    8. 2.7 Measures of the Spread of the Data
    9. 2.8 Descriptive Statistics
    10. Key Terms
    11. Chapter Review
    12. Formula Review
    13. Practice
    14. Homework
    15. Bringing It Together: Homework
    16. References
    17. Solutions
  4. 3 Probability Topics
    1. Introduction
    2. 3.1 Terminology
    3. 3.2 Independent and Mutually Exclusive Events
    4. 3.3 Two Basic Rules of Probability
    5. 3.4 Contingency Tables
    6. 3.5 Tree and Venn Diagrams
    7. 3.6 Probability Topics
    8. Key Terms
    9. Chapter Review
    10. Formula Review
    11. Practice
    12. Bringing It Together: Practice
    13. Homework
    14. Bringing It Together: Homework
    15. References
    16. Solutions
  5. 4 Discrete Random Variables
    1. Introduction
    2. 4.1 Probability Distribution Function (PDF) for a Discrete Random Variable
    3. 4.2 Mean or Expected Value and Standard Deviation
    4. 4.3 Binomial Distribution
    5. 4.4 Geometric Distribution
    6. 4.5 Hypergeometric Distribution
    7. 4.6 Poisson Distribution
    8. 4.7 Discrete Distribution (Playing Card Experiment)
    9. 4.8 Discrete Distribution (Lucky Dice Experiment)
    10. Key Terms
    11. Chapter Review
    12. Formula Review
    13. Practice
    14. Homework
    15. References
    16. Solutions
  6. 5 Continuous Random Variables
    1. Introduction
    2. 5.1 Continuous Probability Functions
    3. 5.2 The Uniform Distribution
    4. 5.3 The Exponential Distribution
    5. 5.4 Continuous Distribution
    6. Key Terms
    7. Chapter Review
    8. Formula Review
    9. Practice
    10. Homework
    11. References
    12. Solutions
  7. 6 The Normal Distribution
    1. Introduction
    2. 6.1 The Standard Normal Distribution
    3. 6.2 Using the Normal Distribution
    4. 6.3 Normal Distribution (Lap Times)
    5. 6.4 Normal Distribution (Pinkie Length)
    6. Key Terms
    7. Chapter Review
    8. Formula Review
    9. Practice
    10. Homework
    11. References
    12. Solutions
  8. 7 The Central Limit Theorem
    1. Introduction
    2. 7.1 The Central Limit Theorem for Sample Means (Averages)
    3. 7.2 The Central Limit Theorem for Sums
    4. 7.3 Using the Central Limit Theorem
    5. 7.4 Central Limit Theorem (Pocket Change)
    6. 7.5 Central Limit Theorem (Cookie Recipes)
    7. Key Terms
    8. Chapter Review
    9. Formula Review
    10. Practice
    11. Homework
    12. References
    13. Solutions
  9. 8 Confidence Intervals
    1. Introduction
    2. 8.1 A Single Population Mean using the Normal Distribution
    3. 8.2 A Single Population Mean using the Student t Distribution
    4. 8.3 A Population Proportion
    5. 8.4 Confidence Interval (Home Costs)
    6. 8.5 Confidence Interval (Place of Birth)
    7. 8.6 Confidence Interval (Women's Heights)
    8. Key Terms
    9. Chapter Review
    10. Formula Review
    11. Practice
    12. Homework
    13. References
    14. Solutions
  10. 9 Hypothesis Testing with One Sample
    1. Introduction
    2. 9.1 Null and Alternative Hypotheses
    3. 9.2 Outcomes and the Type I and Type II Errors
    4. 9.3 Distribution Needed for Hypothesis Testing
    5. 9.4 Rare Events, the Sample, Decision and Conclusion
    6. 9.5 Additional Information and Full Hypothesis Test Examples
    7. 9.6 Hypothesis Testing of a Single Mean and Single Proportion
    8. Key Terms
    9. Chapter Review
    10. Formula Review
    11. Practice
    12. Homework
    13. References
    14. Solutions
  11. 10 Hypothesis Testing with Two Samples
    1. Introduction
    2. 10.1 Two Population Means with Unknown Standard Deviations
    3. 10.2 Two Population Means with Known Standard Deviations
    4. 10.3 Comparing Two Independent Population Proportions
    5. 10.4 Matched or Paired Samples
    6. 10.5 Hypothesis Testing for Two Means and Two Proportions
    7. Key Terms
    8. Chapter Review
    9. Formula Review
    10. Practice
    11. Homework
    12. Bringing It Together: Homework
    13. References
    14. Solutions
  12. 11 The Chi-Square Distribution
    1. Introduction
    2. 11.1 Facts About the Chi-Square Distribution
    3. 11.2 Goodness-of-Fit Test
    4. 11.3 Test of Independence
    5. 11.4 Test for Homogeneity
    6. 11.5 Comparison of the Chi-Square Tests
    7. 11.6 Test of a Single Variance
    8. 11.7 Lab 1: Chi-Square Goodness-of-Fit
    9. 11.8 Lab 2: Chi-Square Test of Independence
    10. Key Terms
    11. Chapter Review
    12. Formula Review
    13. Practice
    14. Homework
    15. Bringing It Together: Homework
    16. References
    17. Solutions
  13. 12 Linear Regression and Correlation
    1. Introduction
    2. 12.1 Linear Equations
    3. 12.2 Scatter Plots
    4. 12.3 The Regression Equation
    5. 12.4 Testing the Significance of the Correlation Coefficient
    6. 12.5 Prediction
    7. 12.6 Outliers
    8. 12.7 Regression (Distance from School)
    9. 12.8 Regression (Textbook Cost)
    10. 12.9 Regression (Fuel Efficiency)
    11. Key Terms
    12. Chapter Review
    13. Formula Review
    14. Practice
    15. Homework
    16. Bringing It Together: Homework
    17. References
    18. Solutions
  14. 13 F Distribution and One-Way ANOVA
    1. Introduction
    2. 13.1 One-Way ANOVA
    3. 13.2 The F Distribution and the F-Ratio
    4. 13.3 Facts About the F Distribution
    5. 13.4 Test of Two Variances
    6. 13.5 Lab: One-Way ANOVA
    7. Key Terms
    8. Chapter Review
    9. Formula Review
    10. Practice
    11. Homework
    12. References
    13. Solutions
  15. A | Review Exercises (Ch 3-13)
  16. B | Practice Tests (1-4) and Final Exams
  17. C | Data Sets
  18. D | Group and Partner Projects
  19. E | Solution Sheets
  20. F | Mathematical Phrases, Symbols, and Formulas
  21. G | Notes for the TI-83, 83+, 84, 84+ Calculators
  22. H | Tables
  23. Index
Stats Lab 7.1

Central Limit Theorem (Pocket Change)

Class Time:

Names:

Student Learning Outcomes
  • The student will demonstrate and compare properties of the central limit theorem.

Note

This lab works best when sampling from several classes and combining data.

Collect the Data
  1. Count the change in your pocket. (Do not include bills.)
  2. Randomly survey 30 classmates. Record the values of the change in Table 7.1.
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    Table 7.1
  3. Construct a histogram. Make five to six intervals. Sketch the graph using a ruler and pencil. Scale the axes.
    Blank graph template. The horizontal axis is labeled Value of the change and the vertical axis is labeled Frequency.
    Figure 7.10
  4. Calculate the following (n = 1; surveying one person at a time):
    1. x ¯ x ¯ = _______
    2. s = _______
  5. Draw a smooth curve through the tops of the bars of the histogram. Use one to two complete sentences to describe the general shape of the curve.

Collecting Averages of PairsRepeat steps one through five of the section Collect the Data. with one exception. Instead of recording the change of 30 classmates, record the average change of 30 pairs.

  1. Randomly survey 30 pairs of classmates.
  2. Record the values of the average of their change in Table 7.2.
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    Table 7.2
  3. Construct a histogram. Scale the axes using the same scaling you used for the section titled Collect the Data. Sketch the graph using a ruler and a pencil.
    This is a blank graph template. The horizontal axis is labeled Value of the change and the vertical axis is labeled Frequency.
    Figure 7.11
  4. Calculate the following (n = 2; surveying two people at a time):
    1. x ¯ x ¯ = _______
    2. s = _______
  5. Draw a smooth curve through tops of the bars of the histogram. Use one to two complete sentences to describe the general shape of the curve.

Collecting Averages of Groups of FiveRepeat steps one through five (of the section titled Collect the Data) with one exception. Instead of recording the change of 30 classmates, record the average change of 30 groups of five.

  1. Randomly survey 30 groups of five classmates.
  2. Record the values of the average of their change.
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    __________ __________ __________ __________ __________
    Table 7.3
  3. Construct a histogram. Scale the axes using the same scaling you used for the section titled Collect the Data. Sketch the graph using a ruler and a pencil.
    This is a blank graph template. The horizontal axis is labeled Value of the change and the vertical axis is labeled Frequency.
    Figure 7.12
  4. Calculate the following (n = 5; surveying five people at a time):
    1. x ¯ x ¯ = _______
    2. s = _______
  5. Draw a smooth curve through tops of the bars of the histogram. Use one to two complete sentences to describe the general shape of the curve.
Discussion Questions
  1. Why did the shape of the distribution of the data change, as n changed? Use one to two complete sentences to explain what happened.
  2. In the section titled Collect the Data, what was the approximate distribution of the data? X ~ _____(_____,_____)
  3. In the section titled Collecting Averages of Groups of Five, what was the approximate distribution of the averages? X ¯ X ¯ ~ _____(_____,_____)
  4. In one to two complete sentences, explain any differences in your answers to the previous two questions.
Citation/Attribution

Want to cite, share, or modify this book? This book is Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 and you must attribute OpenStax.

Attribution information
  • If you are redistributing all or part of this book in a print format, then you must include on every physical page the following attribution:
    Access for free at https://openstax.org/books/introductory-statistics/pages/1-introduction
  • If you are redistributing all or part of this book in a digital format, then you must include on every digital page view the following attribution:
    Access for free at https://openstax.org/books/introductory-statistics/pages/1-introduction
Citation information

© Sep 19, 2013 OpenStax. Textbook content produced by OpenStax is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution License 4.0 license. The OpenStax name, OpenStax logo, OpenStax book covers, OpenStax CNX name, and OpenStax CNX logo are not subject to the Creative Commons license and may not be reproduced without the prior and express written consent of Rice University.