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Introductory Statistics 2e

10.3 Comparing Two Independent Population Proportions

Introductory Statistics 2e10.3 Comparing Two Independent Population Proportions

Table of contents
  1. Preface
  2. 1 Sampling and Data
    1. Introduction
    2. 1.1 Definitions of Statistics, Probability, and Key Terms
    3. 1.2 Data, Sampling, and Variation in Data and Sampling
    4. 1.3 Frequency, Frequency Tables, and Levels of Measurement
    5. 1.4 Experimental Design and Ethics
    6. 1.5 Data Collection Experiment
    7. 1.6 Sampling Experiment
    8. Key Terms
    9. Chapter Review
    10. Practice
    11. Homework
    12. Bringing It Together: Homework
    13. References
    14. Solutions
  3. 2 Descriptive Statistics
    1. Introduction
    2. 2.1 Stem-and-Leaf Graphs (Stemplots), Line Graphs, and Bar Graphs
    3. 2.2 Histograms, Frequency Polygons, and Time Series Graphs
    4. 2.3 Measures of the Location of the Data
    5. 2.4 Box Plots
    6. 2.5 Measures of the Center of the Data
    7. 2.6 Skewness and the Mean, Median, and Mode
    8. 2.7 Measures of the Spread of the Data
    9. 2.8 Descriptive Statistics
    10. Key Terms
    11. Chapter Review
    12. Formula Review
    13. Practice
    14. Homework
    15. Bringing It Together: Homework
    16. References
    17. Solutions
  4. 3 Probability Topics
    1. Introduction
    2. 3.1 Terminology
    3. 3.2 Independent and Mutually Exclusive Events
    4. 3.3 Two Basic Rules of Probability
    5. 3.4 Contingency Tables
    6. 3.5 Tree and Venn Diagrams
    7. 3.6 Probability Topics
    8. Key Terms
    9. Chapter Review
    10. Formula Review
    11. Practice
    12. Bringing It Together: Practice
    13. Homework
    14. Bringing It Together: Homework
    15. References
    16. Solutions
  5. 4 Discrete Random Variables
    1. Introduction
    2. 4.1 Probability Distribution Function (PDF) for a Discrete Random Variable
    3. 4.2 Mean or Expected Value and Standard Deviation
    4. 4.3 Binomial Distribution
    5. 4.4 Geometric Distribution
    6. 4.5 Hypergeometric Distribution
    7. 4.6 Poisson Distribution
    8. 4.7 Discrete Distribution (Playing Card Experiment)
    9. 4.8 Discrete Distribution (Dice Experiment Using Three Regular Dice)
    10. Key Terms
    11. Chapter Review
    12. Formula Review
    13. Practice
    14. Homework
    15. References
    16. Solutions
  6. 5 Continuous Random Variables
    1. Introduction
    2. 5.1 Continuous Probability Functions
    3. 5.2 The Uniform Distribution
    4. 5.3 The Exponential Distribution
    5. 5.4 Continuous Distribution
    6. Key Terms
    7. Chapter Review
    8. Formula Review
    9. Practice
    10. Homework
    11. References
    12. Solutions
  7. 6 The Normal Distribution
    1. Introduction
    2. 6.1 The Standard Normal Distribution
    3. 6.2 Using the Normal Distribution
    4. 6.3 Normal Distribution (Lap Times)
    5. 6.4 Normal Distribution (Pinkie Length)
    6. Key Terms
    7. Chapter Review
    8. Formula Review
    9. Practice
    10. Homework
    11. References
    12. Solutions
  8. 7 The Central Limit Theorem
    1. Introduction
    2. 7.1 The Central Limit Theorem for Sample Means (Averages)
    3. 7.2 The Central Limit Theorem for Sums
    4. 7.3 Using the Central Limit Theorem
    5. 7.4 Central Limit Theorem (Pocket Change)
    6. 7.5 Central Limit Theorem (Cookie Recipes)
    7. Key Terms
    8. Chapter Review
    9. Formula Review
    10. Practice
    11. Homework
    12. References
    13. Solutions
  9. 8 Confidence Intervals
    1. Introduction
    2. 8.1 A Single Population Mean using the Normal Distribution
    3. 8.2 A Single Population Mean using the Student t Distribution
    4. 8.3 A Population Proportion
    5. 8.4 Confidence Interval (Home Costs)
    6. 8.5 Confidence Interval (Place of Birth)
    7. 8.6 Confidence Interval (Women's Heights)
    8. Key Terms
    9. Chapter Review
    10. Formula Review
    11. Practice
    12. Homework
    13. References
    14. Solutions
  10. 9 Hypothesis Testing with One Sample
    1. Introduction
    2. 9.1 Null and Alternative Hypotheses
    3. 9.2 Outcomes and the Type I and Type II Errors
    4. 9.3 Probability Distribution Needed for Hypothesis Testing
    5. 9.4 Rare Events, the Sample, Decision and Conclusion
    6. 9.5 Additional Information and Full Hypothesis Test Examples
    7. 9.6 Hypothesis Testing of a Single Mean and Single Proportion
    8. Key Terms
    9. Chapter Review
    10. Formula Review
    11. Practice
    12. Homework
    13. References
    14. Solutions
  11. 10 Hypothesis Testing with Two Samples
    1. Introduction
    2. 10.1 Two Population Means with Unknown Standard Deviations
    3. 10.2 Two Population Means with Known Standard Deviations
    4. 10.3 Comparing Two Independent Population Proportions
    5. 10.4 Matched or Paired Samples
    6. 10.5 Hypothesis Testing for Two Means and Two Proportions
    7. Key Terms
    8. Chapter Review
    9. Formula Review
    10. Practice
    11. Homework
    12. Bringing It Together: Homework
    13. References
    14. Solutions
  12. 11 The Chi-Square Distribution
    1. Introduction
    2. 11.1 Facts About the Chi-Square Distribution
    3. 11.2 Goodness-of-Fit Test
    4. 11.3 Test of Independence
    5. 11.4 Test for Homogeneity
    6. 11.5 Comparison of the Chi-Square Tests
    7. 11.6 Test of a Single Variance
    8. 11.7 Lab 1: Chi-Square Goodness-of-Fit
    9. 11.8 Lab 2: Chi-Square Test of Independence
    10. Key Terms
    11. Chapter Review
    12. Formula Review
    13. Practice
    14. Homework
    15. Bringing It Together: Homework
    16. References
    17. Solutions
  13. 12 Linear Regression and Correlation
    1. Introduction
    2. 12.1 Linear Equations
    3. 12.2 Scatter Plots
    4. 12.3 The Regression Equation
    5. 12.4 Testing the Significance of the Correlation Coefficient
    6. 12.5 Prediction
    7. 12.6 Outliers
    8. 12.7 Regression (Distance from School)
    9. 12.8 Regression (Textbook Cost)
    10. 12.9 Regression (Fuel Efficiency)
    11. Key Terms
    12. Chapter Review
    13. Formula Review
    14. Practice
    15. Homework
    16. Bringing It Together: Homework
    17. References
    18. Solutions
  14. 13 F Distribution and One-Way ANOVA
    1. Introduction
    2. 13.1 One-Way ANOVA
    3. 13.2 The F Distribution and the F-Ratio
    4. 13.3 Facts About the F Distribution
    5. 13.4 Test of Two Variances
    6. 13.5 Lab: One-Way ANOVA
    7. Key Terms
    8. Chapter Review
    9. Formula Review
    10. Practice
    11. Homework
    12. References
    13. Solutions
  15. A | Review Exercises (Ch 3-13)
  16. B | Practice Tests (1-4) and Final Exams
  17. C | Data Sets
  18. D | Group and Partner Projects
  19. E | Solution Sheets
  20. F | Mathematical Phrases, Symbols, and Formulas
  21. G | NOTEs for the TI-83, 83+, 84, 84+ Calculators
  22. H | Tables
  23. Index

When conducting a hypothesis test that compares two independent population proportions, the following characteristics should be present:

  1. The two independent samples are simple random samples that are independent.
  2. The number of successes is at least five, and the number of failures is at least five, for each of the samples.
  3. Growing literature states that the population must be at least ten or 20 times the size of the sample. This keeps each population from being over-sampled and causing incorrect results.

Comparing two proportions, like comparing two means, is common. If two estimated proportions are different, it may be due to a difference in the populations or it may be due to chance. A hypothesis test can help determine if a difference in the estimated proportions reflects a difference in the population proportions.

Like the case of differences in sample means, we construct a sampling distribution for differences in sample proportions:

p'A=XAnAp'A=XAnA and p'B=XBnBp'B=XBnB are the sample proportions for the two sets of data in question XAXA and XBXB.

The difference of two proportions follows an approximate normal distribution. Generally, the null hypothesis states that the two proportions are the same. That is, H0: pA = pB. To conduct the test, we use a pooled proportion, pc.

The pooled proportion is calculated as follows:
p c = x A + x B n A + n B p c = x A + x B n A + n B
The distribution for the differences is:
P A P B ~N[0, p c (1 p c )( 1 n A + 1 n B ) ] P A P B ~N[0, p c (1 p c )( 1 n A + 1 n B ) ]
The test statistic (z-score) is:
z= ( p A p B )( p A p B ) p c (1 p c )( 1 n A + 1 n B ) z= ( p A p B )( p A p B ) p c (1 p c )( 1 n A + 1 n B )

Example 10.8

Problem

Two types of medication for hives are being tested to determine if there is a difference in the proportions of adult patient reactions. Twenty out of a random sample of 200 adults given medication A still had hives 30 minutes after taking the medication. Twelve out of another random sample of 200 adults given medication B still had hives 30 minutes after taking the medication. Test at a 1% level of significance.

Try It 10.8

Two types of valves are being tested to determine if there is a difference in pressure tolerances. Fifteen out of a random sample of 100 of Valve A cracked under 4,500 psi. Six out of a random sample of 100 of Valve B cracked under 4,500 psi. Test at a 5% level of significance.

Example 10.9

Problem

A research study was conducted about gender differences regarding the use of seat belts in motor vehicles. The researcher believed that the proportion of women not wearing seat belts is less than the proportion of men not wearing seat belts. The data collected represents a random sample of U.S. adults and is summarized in Table 10.12. Is the proportion of women not wearing seat belts less than the proportion of men not wearing seat belts? Test at a 1% level of significance.

MenWomen
Does not wear seat belts 183 156
Total number surveyed 2231 2169
Table 10.12

Try It 10.9

A survey was conducted about the favorable beverage as tea. The data collected is summarized in the table. Is the proportion of men favoring tea more than women favoring tea? Test at a 1% level of significance.

Men Women
Favor tea 16 18
Total surveyed 230 218
Table 10.13

Using the TI-83, 83+, 84, 84+ Calculator

Press STAT. Arrow over to TESTS and press 6:2-PropZTest. Arrow down and enter 156 for x1, 2169 for n1, 183 for x2, and 2231 for n2. Arrow down to p1: and arrow to less than p2. Press ENTER. Arrow down to Calculate and press ENTER. The p-value is P = 0.1045 and the test statistic is z = -1.256.

Example 10.10

Problem

A marketing firm claims that the proportion of younger adults who own electric vehicles is greater than the proportion of older adults who own electric vehicles. A random sample of U.S. adults was taken, and the results of the survey indicate the following:

  • Out of a sample of 232 older adults (aged 35 or older), 5% own electric vehicles.
  • Out of a sample of 1,343 young adults (aged 34 or younger), 10% own electric vehicles.

Test at the 5% level of significance. Is the proportion of younger adults greater than the proportion of older adults with respect to owning electric vehicles?

Using the TI-83, 83+, 84, 84+ Calculator

TI-83+ and TI-84: Press STAT. Arrow over to TESTS and press 6:2-PropZTest. Arrow down and enter 135 for x1, 1343 for n1, 12 for x2, and 232 for n2. Arrow down to p1: and arrow to greater than p2. Press ENTER. Arrow down to Calculate and press ENTER. The P-value is P = 0.0092 and the test statistic is Z = 2.33.

Try It 10.10

A government researcher is investigating whether there is a difference in the use of helmets by motorcyclists in different geographic regions for those states where use of helmets is required by law. The research shows that for motorcyclists in the northeast U.S., 7622 out of 113,231 motorcyclists did not wear helmets. In the southeast U.S., 7439 out of 104,873 motorcyclists did not wear helmets. Test at a 5% significance level. Answer the following questions:

a. Is this a test of two means or two proportions?

b. Which distribution do you use to perform the test?

c. What is the random variable?

d. What are the null and alternative hypothesis? Write the null and alternative hypothesis in symbols.

e. Is this test right-, left-, or two-tailed?

f. What is the p-value?

g. Do you reject or not reject the null hypothesis?

h. At the ___ level of significance, from the sample data, there ______ (is/is not) sufficient evidence to conclude that ____________.

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