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  1. Preface
  2. 1 American Law, Legal Reasoning, and the Legal System
    1. Introduction
    2. 1.1 Basic American Legal Principles
    3. 1.2 Sources and Types of Law
    4. 1.3 Important Business Laws and Regulations
    5. Assessment Questions
    6. End Notes
  3. 2 Disputes and Dispute Settlement
    1. Introduction
    2. 2.1 Negotiation
    3. 2.2 Mediation
    4. 2.3 Arbitration
    5. Assessment Questions
    6. End Notes
  4. 3 Business Ethics and Social Responsibility
    1. Introduction
    2. 3.1 Business Ethics
    3. 3.2 Social Responsibility
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  5. 4 Business and the United States Constitution
    1. Introduction
    2. 4.1 Commerce Clause
    3. 4.2 Constitutional Protections
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  6. 5 Criminal Liability
    1. Introduction
    2. 5.1 Common Business Crimes
    3. 5.2 Civil vs. Criminal Liability
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  7. 6 The Tort System
    1. Introduction
    2. 6.1 Intentional Torts and Negligence
    3. 6.2 Product and Strict Liability
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  8. 7 Contract Law
    1. Introduction
    2. 7.1 Agreement, Consideration, and Promissory Estoppel
    3. 7.2 Capacity and Legality
    4. 7.3 Breach of Contract and Remedies
    5. Assessment Questions
    6. End Notes
  9. 8 Sales Contracts
    1. Introduction
    2. 8.1 The Nature and Origins of Sales Contracts
    3. 8.2 Warranties and Sales Contracts
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  10. 9 Employment and Labor Law
    1. Introduction
    2. 9.1 Employment, Worker Protection, and Immigration Law
    3. 9.2 Labor Law
    4. 9.3 Equal Opportunity in Employment
    5. Assessment Questions
    6. End Notes
  11. 10 Government Regulation
    1. Introduction
    2. 10.1 Administrative Law
    3. 10.2 Regulatory Agencies
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  12. 11 Antitrust Law
    1. Introduction
    2. 11.1 History of Antitrust Law
    3. 11.2 Antitrust Laws
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  13. 12 Unfair Trade Practices and the Federal Trade Commission
    1. Introduction
    2. 12.1 Unfair Trade Practices
    3. 12.2 The Federal Trade Commission
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  14. 13 International Law
    1. Introduction
    2. 13.1 Introduction to International Law
    3. 13.2 Sources and Practice of International Law
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  15. 14 Securities Regulation
    1. Introduction
    2. 14.1 Liability Under the Securities Act
    3. 14.2 The Framework of Securities Regulation
    4. Assessment Questions
    5. End Notes
  16. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
    12. Chapter 12
    13. Chapter 13
    14. Chapter 14
  17. Index
1.

b

3.

Naked restraint occurs as contracts promote a general restraint of competition. If the restraint was created with a goal of long-term impact without boundaries, it was considered to be a naked restraint. Ancillary restraint occurs as the restriction is limited in time and geography. With ancillary restraint, the restraint would be short-term and limited in scope. The courts tended to frown upon naked restraint, but were less consistent with ancillary restraint.

5.

The original purpose of antitrust legislation, i.e., to foster competition that results in lower prices, more products, and more equal distribution of wealth between producers, remains relevant today.

7.

b

9.

c

11.

c

13.

a

15.

The FTC did not formally have a consumer protection mission until the passage of the Wheeler-Lea Act in 1938. This act gave the FTC the power to combat false advertising for any foods, drugs, medical devices, or cosmetics. In addition to the Wheeler-Lea Act, subsequent amendments to the FTC Act, as well as judicial respect toward the agency, broadened the power and jurisdiction of the FTC.

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© Nov 26, 2019 OpenStax. Textbook content produced by OpenStax is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License 4.0 license. The OpenStax name, OpenStax logo, OpenStax book covers, OpenStax CNX name, and OpenStax CNX logo are not subject to the Creative Commons license and may not be reproduced without the prior and express written consent of Rice University.