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American Government 2e

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American Government 2eReview Questions
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  1. Preface
  2. Students and the System
    1. 1 American Government and Civic Engagement
      1. Introduction
      2. 1.1 What is Government?
      3. 1.2 Who Governs? Elitism, Pluralism, and Tradeoffs
      4. 1.3 Engagement in a Democracy
      5. Key Terms
      6. Summary
      7. Review Questions
      8. Critical Thinking Questions
      9. Suggestions for Further Study
    2. 2 The Constitution and Its Origins
      1. Introduction
      2. 2.1 The Pre-Revolutionary Period and the Roots of the American Political Tradition
      3. 2.2 The Articles of Confederation
      4. 2.3 The Development of the Constitution
      5. 2.4 The Ratification of the Constitution
      6. 2.5 Constitutional Change
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    3. 3 American Federalism
      1. Introduction
      2. 3.1 The Division of Powers
      3. 3.2 The Evolution of American Federalism
      4. 3.3 Intergovernmental Relationships
      5. 3.4 Competitive Federalism Today
      6. 3.5 Advantages and Disadvantages of Federalism
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
  3. Individual Agency and Action
    1. 4 Civil Liberties
      1. Introduction
      2. 4.1 What Are Civil Liberties?
      3. 4.2 Securing Basic Freedoms
      4. 4.3 The Rights of Suspects
      5. 4.4 Interpreting the Bill of Rights
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
    2. 5 Civil Rights
      1. Introduction
      2. 5.1 What Are Civil Rights and How Do We Identify Them?
      3. 5.2 The African American Struggle for Equality
      4. 5.3 The Fight for Women’s Rights
      5. 5.4 Civil Rights for Indigenous Groups: Native Americans, Alaskans, and Hawaiians
      6. 5.5 Equal Protection for Other Groups
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    3. 6 The Politics of Public Opinion
      1. Introduction
      2. 6.1 The Nature of Public Opinion
      3. 6.2 How Is Public Opinion Measured?
      4. 6.3 What Does the Public Think?
      5. 6.4 The Effects of Public Opinion
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
    4. 7 Voting and Elections
      1. Introduction
      2. 7.1 Voter Registration
      3. 7.2 Voter Turnout
      4. 7.3 Elections
      5. 7.4 Campaigns and Voting
      6. 7.5 Direct Democracy
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
  4. Toward Collective Action: Mediating Institutions
    1. 8 The Media
      1. Introduction
      2. 8.1 What Is the Media?
      3. 8.2 The Evolution of the Media
      4. 8.3 Regulating the Media
      5. 8.4 The Impact of the Media
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
    2. 9 Political Parties
      1. Introduction
      2. 9.1 What Are Parties and How Did They Form?
      3. 9.2 The Two-Party System
      4. 9.3 The Shape of Modern Political Parties
      5. 9.4 Divided Government and Partisan Polarization
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
    3. 10 Interest Groups and Lobbying
      1. Introduction
      2. 10.1 Interest Groups Defined
      3. 10.2 Collective Action and Interest Group Formation
      4. 10.3 Interest Groups as Political Participation
      5. 10.4 Pathways of Interest Group Influence
      6. 10.5 Free Speech and the Regulation of Interest Groups
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
  5. Delivering Collective Action: Formal Institutions
    1. 11 Congress
      1. Introduction
      2. 11.1 The Institutional Design of Congress
      3. 11.2 Congressional Elections
      4. 11.3 Congressional Representation
      5. 11.4 House and Senate Organizations
      6. 11.5 The Legislative Process
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    2. 12 The Presidency
      1. Introduction
      2. 12.1 The Design and Evolution of the Presidency
      3. 12.2 The Presidential Election Process
      4. 12.3 Organizing to Govern
      5. 12.4 The Public Presidency
      6. 12.5 Presidential Governance: Direct Presidential Action
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    3. 13 The Courts
      1. Introduction
      2. 13.1 Guardians of the Constitution and Individual Rights
      3. 13.2 The Dual Court System
      4. 13.3 The Federal Court System
      5. 13.4 The Supreme Court
      6. 13.5 Judicial Decision-Making and Implementation by the Supreme Court
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    4. 14 State and Local Government
      1. Introduction
      2. 14.1 State Power and Delegation
      3. 14.2 State Political Culture
      4. 14.3 Governors and State Legislatures
      5. 14.4 State Legislative Term Limits
      6. 14.5 County and City Government
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
  6. The Outputs of Government
    1. 15 The Bureaucracy
      1. Introduction
      2. 15.1 Bureaucracy and the Evolution of Public Administration
      3. 15.2 Toward a Merit-Based Civil Service
      4. 15.3 Understanding Bureaucracies and their Types
      5. 15.4 Controlling the Bureaucracy
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
    2. 16 Domestic Policy
      1. Introduction
      2. 16.1 What Is Public Policy?
      3. 16.2 Categorizing Public Policy
      4. 16.3 Policy Arenas
      5. 16.4 Policymakers
      6. 16.5 Budgeting and Tax Policy
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    3. 17 Foreign Policy
      1. Introduction
      2. 17.1 Defining Foreign Policy
      3. 17.2 Foreign Policy Instruments
      4. 17.3 Institutional Relations in Foreign Policy
      5. 17.4 Approaches to Foreign Policy
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
  7. A | Declaration of Independence
  8. B | The Constitution of the United States
  9. C | Federalist Papers #10 and #51
  10. D | Electoral College Votes by State, 2012–2020
  11. E | Selected Supreme Court Cases
  12. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
    12. Chapter 12
    13. Chapter 13
    14. Chapter 14
    15. Chapter 15
    16. Chapter 16
    17. Chapter 17
  13. References
  14. Index
1.

A local station that broadcasts national network programming is called a(an) ________ station.

  1. affiliate
  2. cable
  3. digital
  4. network
2.

Cable programming is often ________.

  1. local
  2. national
  3. network
  4. sports
3.

A conglomerate is a corporation that ________.

  1. owns all television news stations in a state
  2. owns many businesses and media networks
  3. owns only radio stations
  4. owns only televisions and newspapers
4.

When acting as an agenda setter, the media ________.

  1. decides which issues deserve public attention
  2. covers presidential campaigns equally
  3. reports on corruption in government
  4. brings in advertising revenue for the media corporation
5.

How can conglomerates censor information?

6.

In what ways is media responsible for promoting the public good?

7.

Why is social media an effective way to spread news and information?

8.

Newspapers during the Revolutionary War period tended to ________.

  1. give fake news and sensationalize stories
  2. unite the colonists and provide information about the British
  3. print party propaganda
  4. attack colonial politicians
9.

Muckraking occurs when newspapers ________.

  1. investigate problems in government and business
  2. investigate actions of celebrities
  3. print sensational news on the front page to sell papers
  4. print more editorials and opinion pieces to sell papers
10.

Radio quiz shows and comedy shows were most popular in the ________.

  1. 1900s
  2. 1930s
  3. 1970s
  4. 1990s
11.

Television news became a regular feature during ________ due to the public’s demand for ________ to explain current events.

  1. WWI; images and maps
  2. Great Depression; charts and tables
  3. WWII; images and maps
  4. Vietnam War; charts and tables
12.

Why did Franklin D. Roosevelt’s fireside chats help the president enact his policies?

13.

How have modern presidents used television to reach out to citizens?

14.

Why is soft news good at reaching out and educating viewers?

15.

In which circumstance would the courts find libel?

  1. A reporter uses a source that incorrectly states a celebrity is using drugs.
  2. A columnist writes his opinion about whether an actor is hiding a drug problem.
  3. A television reporter delivers a story about increased drug use at the local college.
  4. A reporter writes that local college students are drug dealers but has no sources.
16.

The Supreme Court determined that the right of the press to print classified material ________.

  1. is obsolete, and the press may never print classified material
  2. is partial, and the press may print classified material only if it does not compromise troops or covert operatives
  3. is complete, and the press may print anything it likes
  4. has not yet been defined
17.

The Federal Communications Commission oversees the programming of which entities?

  1. television
  2. television and radio
  3. television, radio, and satellite
  4. television, radio, satellite, and cable
18.

Which of the following is a reasonable exception to the Freedom of Information Act?

  1. medical records for government employees
  2. budget for the Department of Labor
  3. minutes from a president’s cabinet meeting
  4. transcript of meetings between Department of State negotiators and Russian trade negotiators
19.

Why is it a potential problem that the equal-time rule does not apply to candidates’ supporters?

20.

Under what circumstances might a journalist be compelled to give up a source?

21.

Which of the following is an example of episodic framing?

  1. a story on drug abuse that interviews addicts and discusses reasons for addiction and government responses to help addicts
  2. a story on how drug abuse policy has changed since 1984
  3. a story on candidates’ answers to a drug question in a debate
  4. a story detailing arguments against needle exchange programs
22.

According to research, why might a woman decide not to run for office?

  1. She feels the work is too hard.
  2. She fears her positions will be covered too closely by the press.
  3. She fears the media will criticize her family.
  4. She fears the campaign will be too expensive.
23.

Media coverage of a race tends to ________.

  1. accurately portray all races equally
  2. accurately portray whites and blacks as victims
  3. overrepresent whites and the elderly as poor
  4. overrepresent African Americans as poor
24.

How might framing or priming affect the way a reader or viewer thinks about an issue?

25.

Why would inaccurate coverage of race and gender affect policy or elections?

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