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American Government 2e

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American Government 2eReview Questions
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  1. Preface
  2. Students and the System
    1. 1 American Government and Civic Engagement
      1. Introduction
      2. 1.1 What is Government?
      3. 1.2 Who Governs? Elitism, Pluralism, and Tradeoffs
      4. 1.3 Engagement in a Democracy
      5. Key Terms
      6. Summary
      7. Review Questions
      8. Critical Thinking Questions
      9. Suggestions for Further Study
    2. 2 The Constitution and Its Origins
      1. Introduction
      2. 2.1 The Pre-Revolutionary Period and the Roots of the American Political Tradition
      3. 2.2 The Articles of Confederation
      4. 2.3 The Development of the Constitution
      5. 2.4 The Ratification of the Constitution
      6. 2.5 Constitutional Change
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    3. 3 American Federalism
      1. Introduction
      2. 3.1 The Division of Powers
      3. 3.2 The Evolution of American Federalism
      4. 3.3 Intergovernmental Relationships
      5. 3.4 Competitive Federalism Today
      6. 3.5 Advantages and Disadvantages of Federalism
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
  3. Individual Agency and Action
    1. 4 Civil Liberties
      1. Introduction
      2. 4.1 What Are Civil Liberties?
      3. 4.2 Securing Basic Freedoms
      4. 4.3 The Rights of Suspects
      5. 4.4 Interpreting the Bill of Rights
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
    2. 5 Civil Rights
      1. Introduction
      2. 5.1 What Are Civil Rights and How Do We Identify Them?
      3. 5.2 The African American Struggle for Equality
      4. 5.3 The Fight for Women’s Rights
      5. 5.4 Civil Rights for Indigenous Groups: Native Americans, Alaskans, and Hawaiians
      6. 5.5 Equal Protection for Other Groups
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    3. 6 The Politics of Public Opinion
      1. Introduction
      2. 6.1 The Nature of Public Opinion
      3. 6.2 How Is Public Opinion Measured?
      4. 6.3 What Does the Public Think?
      5. 6.4 The Effects of Public Opinion
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
    4. 7 Voting and Elections
      1. Introduction
      2. 7.1 Voter Registration
      3. 7.2 Voter Turnout
      4. 7.3 Elections
      5. 7.4 Campaigns and Voting
      6. 7.5 Direct Democracy
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
  4. Toward Collective Action: Mediating Institutions
    1. 8 The Media
      1. Introduction
      2. 8.1 What Is the Media?
      3. 8.2 The Evolution of the Media
      4. 8.3 Regulating the Media
      5. 8.4 The Impact of the Media
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
    2. 9 Political Parties
      1. Introduction
      2. 9.1 What Are Parties and How Did They Form?
      3. 9.2 The Two-Party System
      4. 9.3 The Shape of Modern Political Parties
      5. 9.4 Divided Government and Partisan Polarization
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
    3. 10 Interest Groups and Lobbying
      1. Introduction
      2. 10.1 Interest Groups Defined
      3. 10.2 Collective Action and Interest Group Formation
      4. 10.3 Interest Groups as Political Participation
      5. 10.4 Pathways of Interest Group Influence
      6. 10.5 Free Speech and the Regulation of Interest Groups
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
  5. Delivering Collective Action: Formal Institutions
    1. 11 Congress
      1. Introduction
      2. 11.1 The Institutional Design of Congress
      3. 11.2 Congressional Elections
      4. 11.3 Congressional Representation
      5. 11.4 House and Senate Organizations
      6. 11.5 The Legislative Process
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    2. 12 The Presidency
      1. Introduction
      2. 12.1 The Design and Evolution of the Presidency
      3. 12.2 The Presidential Election Process
      4. 12.3 Organizing to Govern
      5. 12.4 The Public Presidency
      6. 12.5 Presidential Governance: Direct Presidential Action
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    3. 13 The Courts
      1. Introduction
      2. 13.1 Guardians of the Constitution and Individual Rights
      3. 13.2 The Dual Court System
      4. 13.3 The Federal Court System
      5. 13.4 The Supreme Court
      6. 13.5 Judicial Decision-Making and Implementation by the Supreme Court
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    4. 14 State and Local Government
      1. Introduction
      2. 14.1 State Power and Delegation
      3. 14.2 State Political Culture
      4. 14.3 Governors and State Legislatures
      5. 14.4 State Legislative Term Limits
      6. 14.5 County and City Government
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
  6. The Outputs of Government
    1. 15 The Bureaucracy
      1. Introduction
      2. 15.1 Bureaucracy and the Evolution of Public Administration
      3. 15.2 Toward a Merit-Based Civil Service
      4. 15.3 Understanding Bureaucracies and their Types
      5. 15.4 Controlling the Bureaucracy
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
    2. 16 Domestic Policy
      1. Introduction
      2. 16.1 What Is Public Policy?
      3. 16.2 Categorizing Public Policy
      4. 16.3 Policy Arenas
      5. 16.4 Policymakers
      6. 16.5 Budgeting and Tax Policy
      7. Key Terms
      8. Summary
      9. Review Questions
      10. Critical Thinking Questions
      11. Suggestions for Further Study
    3. 17 Foreign Policy
      1. Introduction
      2. 17.1 Defining Foreign Policy
      3. 17.2 Foreign Policy Instruments
      4. 17.3 Institutional Relations in Foreign Policy
      5. 17.4 Approaches to Foreign Policy
      6. Key Terms
      7. Summary
      8. Review Questions
      9. Critical Thinking Questions
      10. Suggestions for Further Study
  7. A | Declaration of Independence
  8. B | The Constitution of the United States
  9. C | Federalist Papers #10 and #51
  10. D | Electoral College Votes by State, 2012–2020
  11. E | Selected Supreme Court Cases
  12. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
    12. Chapter 12
    13. Chapter 13
    14. Chapter 14
    15. Chapter 15
    16. Chapter 16
    17. Chapter 17
  13. References
  14. Index
1.

Which statement about federal and unitary systems is most accurate?

  1. In a federal system, power is concentrated in the states; in a unitary system, it is concentrated in the national government.
  2. In a federal system, the constitution allocates powers between states and federal government; in a unitary system, powers are lodged in the national government.
  3. Today there are more countries with federal systems than with unitary systems.
  4. The United States and Japan have federal systems, while Great Britain and Canada have unitary systems.
2.

Which statement is most accurate about the sources of revenue for local and state governments?

  1. Taxes generate well over one-half the total revenue of local and state governments.
  2. Property taxes generate the most tax revenue for both local and state governments.
  3. Between 30 and 40 percent of the revenue for local and state governments comes from grant money.
  4. Local and state governments generate an equal amount of revenue from issuing licenses and certificates.
3.

What key constitutional provisions define the scope of authority of the federal and state governments?

4.

What are the main functions of federal and state governments?

5.

In McCulloch v. Maryland, the Supreme Court invoked which provisions of the constitution?

  1. Tenth Amendment and spending clause
  2. commerce clause and supremacy clause
  3. necessary and proper clause and supremacy clause
  4. taxing power and necessary and proper clause
6.

Which statement about new federalism is not true?

  1. New federalism was launched by President Nixon and continued by President Reagan.
  2. New federalism is based on the idea that decentralization of responsibility enhances administrative efficiency.
  3. United States v. Lopez is a Supreme Court ruling that advanced the logic of new federalism.
  4. President Reagan was able to promote new federalism consistently throughout his administration.
7.

Which is not a merit of cooperative federalism?

  1. Federal cooperation helps mitigate the problem of collective action among states.
  2. Federal assistance encourages state and local governments to generate positive externalities.
  3. Cooperative federalism respects the traditional jurisdictional boundaries between states and federal government.
  4. Federal assistance ensures some degree of uniformity of public services across states.
8.

What are the main differences between cooperative federalism and dual federalism?

9.

What were the implications of McCulloch v. Maryland for federalism?

10.

Which statement about federal grants in recent decades is most accurate?

  1. The federal government allocates the most grant money to income security.
  2. The amount of federal grant money going to states has steadily increased since the 1960s.
  3. The majority of federal grants are block grants.
  4. Block grants tend to gain more flexibility over time.
11.

Which statement about unfunded mandates is false?

  1. The Unfunded Mandates Reform Act has prevented Congress from using unfunded mandates.
  2. The Clean Air Act is a type of federal partial preemptive regulation.
  3. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act establishes crosscutting requirements.
  4. New federalism does not promote the use of unfunded mandates.
12.

What does it mean to refer to the carrot of grants and the stick of mandates?

13.

Which statement about immigration federalism is false?

  1. The Arizona v. United States decision struck down all Arizona’s most restrictive provisions on undocumented immigration.
  2. Since the 1990s, states have increasingly moved into the policy domain of immigration.
  3. Federal immigration laws trump state laws.
  4. States’ involvement in immigration is partly due to their interest in preventing undocumented immigrants from accessing public services such as education and welfare benefits.
14.

Which statement about the evolution of same-sex marriage is false?

  1. The federal government became involved in this issue when it passed DOMA.
  2. In the 1990s and 2000s, the number of state restrictions on same-sex marriage increased.
  3. United States v. Windsor legalized same-sex marriage in the United States.
  4. More than half the states had legalized same-sex marriage by the time the Supreme Court made same-sex marriage legal nationwide in 2015.
15.

Which statement about venue shopping is true?

  1. MADD steered the drinking age issue from the federal government down to the states.
  2. Anti-abortion advocates have steered the abortion issue from the states up to the federal government.
  3. Both MADD and anti-abortion proponents redirected their advocacy from the states to the federal government.
  4. None of the statements are correct.
16.

What does venue shopping mean?

17.

Which of the following is not a benefit of federalism?

  1. Federalism promotes political participation.
  2. Federalism encourages economic equality across the country.
  3. Federalism provides for multiple levels of government action.
  4. Federalism accommodates a diversity of opinion.
18.

Describe the advantages of federalism.

19.

Describe the disadvantages of federalism.

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