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  1. Preface
  2. 1 Why Ethics Matter
    1. Introduction
    2. 1.1 Being a Professional of Integrity
    3. 1.2 Ethics and Profitability
    4. 1.3 Multiple versus Single Ethical Standards
    5. Summary
    6. Key Terms
    7. Assessment Questions
    8. End Notes
  3. 2 Ethics from Antiquity to the Present
    1. Introduction
    2. 2.1 The Concept of Ethical Business in Ancient Athens
    3. 2.2 Ethical Advice for Nobles and Civil Servants in Ancient China
    4. 2.3 Comparing the Virtue Ethics of East and West
    5. 2.4 Utilitarianism: The Greatest Good for the Greatest Number
    6. 2.5 Deontology: Ethics as Duty
    7. 2.6 A Theory of Justice
    8. Summary
    9. Key Terms
    10. Assessment Questions
    11. End Notes
  4. 3 Defining and Prioritizing Stakeholders
    1. Introduction
    2. 3.1 Adopting a Stakeholder Orientation
    3. 3.2 Weighing Stakeholder Claims
    4. 3.3 Ethical Decision-Making and Prioritizing Stakeholders
    5. 3.4 Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR)
    6. Summary
    7. Key Terms
    8. Assessment Questions
    9. End Notes
  5. 4 Three Special Stakeholders: Society, the Environment, and Government
    1. Introduction
    2. 4.1 Corporate Law and Corporate Responsibility
    3. 4.2 Sustainability: Business and the Environment
    4. 4.3 Government and the Private Sector
    5. Summary
    6. Key Terms
    7. Assessment Questions
    8. End Notes
  6. 5 The Impact of Culture and Time on Business Ethics
    1. Introduction
    2. 5.1 The Relationship between Business Ethics and Culture
    3. 5.2 Business Ethics over Time
    4. 5.3 The Influence of Geography and Religion
    5. 5.4 Are the Values Central to Business Ethics Universal?
    6. Summary
    7. Key Terms
    8. Assessment Questions
    9. End Notes
  7. 6 What Employers Owe Employees
    1. Introduction
    2. 6.1 The Workplace Environment and Working Conditions
    3. 6.2 What Constitutes a Fair Wage?
    4. 6.3 An Organized Workforce
    5. 6.4 Privacy in the Workplace
    6. Summary
    7. Key Terms
    8. Assessment Questions
    9. End Notes
  8. 7 What Employees Owe Employers
    1. Introduction
    2. 7.1 Loyalty to the Company
    3. 7.2 Loyalty to the Brand and to Customers
    4. 7.3 Contributing to a Positive Work Atmosphere
    5. 7.4 Financial Integrity
    6. 7.5 Criticism of the Company and Whistleblowing
    7. Summary
    8. Key Terms
    9. Assessment Questions
    10. End Notes
  9. 8 Recognizing and Respecting the Rights of All
    1. Introduction
    2. 8.1 Diversity and Inclusion in the Workforce
    3. 8.2 Accommodating Different Abilities and Faiths
    4. 8.3 Sexual Identification and Orientation
    5. 8.4 Income Inequalities
    6. 8.5 Animal Rights and the Implications for Business
    7. Summary
    8. Key Terms
    9. Assessment Questions
    10. End Notes
  10. 9 Professions under the Microscope
    1. Introduction
    2. 9.1 Entrepreneurship and Start-Up Culture
    3. 9.2 The Influence of Advertising
    4. 9.3 The Insurance Industry
    5. 9.4 Ethical Issues in the Provision of Health Care
    6. Summary
    7. Key Terms
    8. Assessment Questions
    9. End Notes
  11. 10 Changing Work Environments and Future Trends
    1. Introduction
    2. 10.1 More Telecommuting or Less?
    3. 10.2 Workplace Campuses
    4. 10.3 Alternatives to Traditional Patterns of Work
    5. 10.4 Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, and the Workplace of the Future
    6. Summary
    7. Key Terms
    8. Assessment Questions
    9. End Notes
  12. 11 Epilogue: Why Ethics Still Matter
    1. Introduction
    2. 11.1 Business Ethics in an Evolving Environment
    3. 11.2 Committing to an Ethical View
    4. 11.3 Becoming an Ethical Professional
    5. 11.4 Making a Difference in the Business World
    6. End Notes
  13. A | The Lives of Ethical Philosophers
  14. B | Profiles in Business Ethics: Contemporary Thought Leaders
  15. C | A Succinct Theory of Business Ethics
  16. Answer Key
    1. Chapter 1
    2. Chapter 2
    3. Chapter 3
    4. Chapter 4
    5. Chapter 5
    6. Chapter 6
    7. Chapter 7
    8. Chapter 8
    9. Chapter 9
    10. Chapter 10
    11. Chapter 11
  17. Index
1Patrick Henry, “Why Some Startups Succeed (and Why Most Fail),” Entrepreneur, February 18, 2017. https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/288769.
2Mike Isaac, “Inside Uber’s Aggressive, Unrestrained Workplace Culture,” New York Times, February 22, 2017. https://www.nytimes.com/2017/02/22/technology/uber-workplace-culture.html; David Swan, “Uber Boss Details New Direction,” The Australian,” November 17, 2017. In the latter, Dara Khosrowshahi, Kalanick’s replacement as CEO at Uber, outlines his attempts to move the company well beyond its poisonous atmosphere, observing that Uber “must adapt to become a great company where every person feels respected and challenged, can contribute in his or her own, and grow as an individual and as a professional.”
3H.H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills, eds., translators, From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (New York: Oxford University Press, 1946), 196.
4H.H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills, eds., translators, From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (New York: Oxford University Press, 1946), 204.
5H.H. Gerth and C. Wright Mills, eds., translators, From Max Weber: Essays in Sociology (New York: Oxford University Press, 1946), 228.
6Michael A. Lutzker, “Max Weber and the Analysis of Modern Bureaucratic Organization: Notes Toward a Theory of Appraisal,” American Archivist, 45, no. 2 (1982): 121.
7The author worked for many years in the 1980s in human resources at the Walt Disney Company at its corporate site in Burbank, California. A popular training course offered in-house to employees new to professional or managerial roles was “Disney Way,” in which the leadership culture of the company was traced back to its founding in 1926 and how that culture had remained greatly intact over the intervening years.
8Paul Orfalea and Ann Marsh, Copy This! (New York: Workman Publishing Company, Inc., 2005), 99.
9Paul Orfalea and Ann Marsh, Copy This! (New York: Workman Publishing Company, Inc., 2005), 105.
10Paul Orfalea and Ann Marsh, Copy This! (New York: Workman Publishing Company, Inc., 2005), 99–115.
11Kelly Jensen, “The Power a Social Media Policy Plugs into Your Brand,” QSRweb.com, May 21, 2018. https://www.qsrweb.com/blogs/the-power-a-social-media-policy-plugs-into-your-brand/.
12The Millennial Generation is defined by different metrics, depending on who the assessor is. For many, though, this generation consists of those who are currently (in 2018) 18 to 35 years of age. See “Global Marketing Analytics Market Analysis, Growth, Trends & Forecast 2018-2023, with an Expected CAGR of 13.17% - ResearchAndMarkets.com,” BusinessWire. May 18, 2018. https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180518005174/en/Global-Marketing-Analytics-Market-Analysis-Growth-Trends.
13Paul A. Argenti, Corporate Communication, 7th ed. (New York: McGraw Hill Education, 2016), 261.
14Paul A. Argenti, Corporate Communication, 7th ed. (New York: McGraw Hill Education, 2016), 265.
15John Kenneth Galbraith, The Affluent Society, 3rd ed. (New York: Houghton Mifflin Press, 1976), 103.
16Pet Rock. http://www.petrock.com (accessed December 27, 2017).
17See “Impact of Food Advertising on Children” in Slogan, January 31, 2018. The article states, “children less than eight are viewed by many child development researchers as vulnerable to misleading advertising. The intense marketing of high fat, high sugar foods to this age group is termed as exploitative because children do not understand that commercials are designed to sell products and they do not possess the cognitive ability to comprehend or evaluate the advertising.” This applies regardless of the medium. https://global.factiva.com/ha/default.aspx#./!?&_suid=1528231282086007969979052352172.
18David Aaronovitch, “Subliminal Advertising: Unmasking the Myth or Menace in Hidden Messages,” The Times, January 19, 2015. https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/subliminal-advertising-unmasking-the-myth-or-menace-in-hidden-messages-xm3wnn0fnvx.
19“Marketing Research; Researchers from University of South Carolina Report Recent Findings in Marketing Research (Drink Coca-Cola, Eat Popcorn, and Choose Powerade: Testing the Limits of Subliminal Persuasion),” Marketing Weekly News, December 18, 2015.
20Robert D. Hogue, “Marine Insurance,” International Insurance Monitor, 52, no. 4 (1999): 25–26; Shawn Moynihan and Caterina Pontoriero, “Inside Lloyd’s: Demystifying the Inner Workings of the World’s Most Famous Insurance Market,” National Underwriter Property & Casual, October 6, 2016. Insurance “underwriters”—the name which remains in use today—were those agents who signed their names beneath the language of the contract.
21“Hurricane Harvey Has Exposed the Inadequacy of Flood Insurance,” The Economist, September 9, 2017. https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2017/09/09/hurricane-harvey-has-exposed-the-inadequacy-of-flood-insurance.
22“National Flood Insurance Program,” Department of Homeland Security. https://www.fema.gov/national-flood-insurance-program (accessed August 8, 2018).
23Don Jergler, “Climate Change and the ‘Fire Insurance Predicament,’” Insurance Journal, February 8, 2018. Jergler quotes comments columnist Thomas Elias made in late January 2018 in the San Diego Tribune.
24“What’s on the Horizon for the Insurance Industry?” Mondaq Business Briefing, August 10, 2017. https://www.highbeam.com/doc/1G1-500231558.html.
25As examples of this arrangement, consider Petrobras, the Brazilian oil giant that was founded in 1953 and has always featured some mix of government and private ownership. Currently, government direct and indirect ownership constitutes about 65 percent, with private investment making up the remaining 35 percent. Another instance is Malaysia Airlines, founded in the late-1940s, and for most of that time, it also has been held by some combination of government and private ownership.
26“Insurance Carriers,” Dun & Bradstreet. http://crmwebdev.mykonicaminolta.com/industryinfo/industryinfo.html?id=1901 (accessed August 7, 2018).
27“Insurance Carriers,” Dun & Bradstreet. http://crmwebdev.mykonicaminolta.com/industryinfo/industryinfo.html?id=1901 (accessed August 7, 2018).
28Julia Angwin, et al., “Minority Neighborhoods Pay Higher Car Insurance Premiums Than White Areas with the Same Risk,” ProPublica Investigative Reporting, April 5, 2017.
29Julia Angwin, et al., “Minority Neighborhoods Pay Higher Car Insurance Premiums Than White Areas with the Same Risk,” ProPublica Investigative Reporting, April 5, 2017.
30“U.S. Can Learn from Other Nations’ Health Care Systems,” Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/hsph-in-the-news/health-care-system-aca (accessed August 8, 2018).
31Eric C. Schneider, et al., “Mirror, Mirror 2017: International Comparison Reflects Flaws and Opportunities for Better U.S. Health Care,” The Commonwealth Fund. July 2017. https://interactives.commonwealthfund.org/2017/july/mirror-mirror/
32William B. Schultz, “Maryland’s Price-Gouging Law Targets the Wrong Prescription Drugs,” Washington Post, August 4, 2017.
33John E. Murray, Origins of American Health Insurance: A History of Industrial Sickness Funds (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007), xi.
34John E. Murray, Origins of American Health Insurance: A History of Industrial Sickness Funds (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007), 3.
35A specific organization that serves as an example of this is the Knights of Columbus, chartered in New Haven, Connecticut, in 1882 as a ”fraternal benefit society” of Roman Catholic workers (principally Irish and Italian Americans) who found themselves unable to qualify for other forms of coverage, because of their ethnic identities. In this earlier era, typically featuring only fathers as breadwinners, the Knights were formed most importantly to provide income for families whose husbands and fathers had experienced illness or injury or death on the job and so were unable to provide for their families. See the society’s website, http://www.kofc.org/ (accessed August 8, 2018).
36John E. Murray, Origins of American Health Insurance: A History of Industrial Sickness Funds (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007), 17, 30–31.
37Julie Carlson, “The Evolution of Workplace Wellness Programs,” Baylor Business Review (Fall 2014): 21.
38Julie Carlson, “The Evolution of Workplace Wellness Programs,” Baylor Business Review (Fall 2014): 23.
39Michael Hiltzik, “The Dark Side of ‘Voluntary’ Worker Wellness Programs,” Los Angeles Times, December 27, 2017.
40Richard J. Herzog, Katie Counts McClain, and Kymberleigh R. Rigard, “Governmentality, Biopolitical Control, and a Value Pluralist Perspective of Wellness Programs: Creating Utopian Employees,” Administrative Theory & Praxis 38 (2016): 37–51. To appreciate the researchers’ full embrace of wellness programs, note their assertion in the article’s conclusion: “The creation of utopian employees, as discussed in this article, is better achieved by considering value pluralism when embracing the healthism paradigm and avoiding workplace dystopias.” None of us wishes to work in a “dystopian” workplace, but are we ready to become “utopian employees”?
41Michael Hiltzik, “The Dark Side of ‘Voluntary’ Worker Wellness Programs,” Los Angeles Times, December 27, 2017.
42“Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act,” Healthcare.gov. https://www.healthcare.gov/glossary/patient-protection-and-affordable-care-act/ (accessed August 8, 2018).
43Kris B. Mamula, “Affordable Care Act Rates in Pa. Will Rise, but Lower Than Expected,” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, June 6, 2018. Mamula’s article is about insurer requests for an increase in their rates for coverage under the ACA in 2019 and the actual increase in these same rates for 2018 in three states: New York, Pennsylvania, and Washington. The prediction was that rates would increase approximately 5 percent in Pennsylvania for 2019 (as opposed to nearly 31 percent in 2018), more than 20 percent in New York, and nearly 20 percent in Washington. Mamula also observed that the rate of Pennsylvanians without any form of health insurance fell to a record low rate of 5.6 percent in 2018.
44Brian C. Mooney, “‘RomneyCare’—A Revolution That Basically Worked,” Boston Globe, June 26, 2011; Massachusetts Health Connector. http://www.mahealthconnector.org.
45Michael Hiltzik, “Complexities of Single-Payer Care,” Los Angeles Times, February 11, 2018.
46Kim Soffen, “Single-Payer Would Drastically Change Health Care in America. Here’s How It Works,” Washington Post, October 17, 2017.
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